News & Events

Current Events

Stories of Abduction and Tales of Breaking Free: From ADHD Monsters to Space Aliens in the Contemporary U.S.

Monday, November 27, 2017

Americans know their dominant national story centers on ideals of freedom, social mobility, and progress. But those ideals are constantly shadowed by the counter-figures of captivity and immobility. This talk is going to muse on different ways we talk about hard-to-articulate feelings of captivity and containment, from the inner subjective states of neurodivergence, to stories of uncanny captivity in UFO abduction. I will think about how idiosyncratic individual experiences and public narratives of captivity resonate with each other. How do these narratives move from the margins to the center of political discourse – and to what effect? This talk will touch on neurodiversity forums on tumblr, the medicalized idea of the monster, and UFO abduction stories. In the second half of the talk, I will invite members of the audience to tell their own stories of captivity, in both uncanny or ordinary registers.  Come with a story to tell!​

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
Contact: Laura Kunreuther
E-mail: kunreuth@bard.edu
Phone: 845-758-7215 E-mail to Friend

Past Events

a Lunchtime Workshop

Engaged Ethnography in Iraq with Kali Rubaii, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Kali Rubaii is Charlotte Newcomb Fellow at University of California, Santa Cruz. Her dissertation, Counterinsurgency and the Ethical Life of Material Things in Anbar Iraq, documents the impacts of the Global War on Terror on farming families in Iraq.

In 2014 and 2015, at the height of militia struggles among ISIS and other subnational militias over Anbar province, Kali lived and travelled with farming families as they traversed war-pocked landscapes to access their crops and livestock; sought alternative methods of conceiving children, fertilizing date trees, and supplementing soil; and interacted with militias, drones, and toxic military waste. She later conducted fieldwork with counterinsurgency operatives in the United States, Jordan, Denmark, and Kurdistan, who work frequently in Iraq.

In approaching the Global War on Terror as a concerted effort to preempt organized armed resistance by making Anbar’s social and physical landscapes docile, Kali’s ethnographic methods highlight the turmoil underlying a study of violence and harm. When we begin to examine a concept like war or counterterrorism, where do we find ourselves looking for answers? What does participant observation mean in a study of harm: to what degree does an ethnographer participate in harming and being harmed? What kind of conversation happens when we speak to people who kill the people we love? What is the role of fear in limiting our capacities to know things? And what are our obligations to distant or even unknown others over a lifetime?

The workshop will be informal, so students, faculty and staff interested are welcome to come (and bring your lunch!) for any amount of time they can. See you there!

Time: 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Location: Kline French Room E-mail to Friend

The Black Box of Police Torture

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

My talk details the manhunt, arrest, and torture of a convicted cop killer named Andrew Wilson. Wilson was one of approximately 125 Black men who, between 1972 and 1991, were tortured by various means at Chicago’s Area Two police precinct. Beyond these specific dates and outside of this particular location, journalists place the total number of torture survivors at roughly 200.

Given the history of police torture in Chicago, this talk explores the twinned meanings of both the object and concept referred to as the Black Box. Doing so will reveal how the mysterious interworkings of a police torture operation somehow became accepted. Throughout this talk, the Black Box will reference the name of a torture device used to send electronic currents through a person’s body for the purpose of coercing a confession; and it will also refer to the label I give for the conventional agreement, among a group of police officers, to stop trying to understand how and why torture is taking place in their very own precinct. That is to say, during Wilson’s ordeal, the Black Box served as an implicit agreement between police officers that their activity should remain concealed. That is, in attempting to hide the grisly details of their torture operation, these officers designed for themselves a conceptual Black Box. Contained in this box were sweeping, unexamined stereotypes about good and evil, about where and how the evil people live, about the color of the skin of those evil people, and about what it is permissible to do to protect against them.

Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

God Mountains and Fengshui Forests: Sacred/Secular Dialectics and the Fate of Rural Tibetan and Han Communities in China’s Ecological Civilization

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Animism and vitalism have captured the imagination of post-structural theorists, ontologically-inclined ethnographers, and several cultural geographers. This presentation draws on works by scholars who have explored the divide, or dialectic, between sacred and secular space (Lefebvre, Foucault, Viveiros de Castro, and others) to explore the contemporary political ecology of Tibetan sacred mountains (gzhi bdag) and Han sacred forests (fengshuilin) as China strives to build a post-industrial Ecological Civilization (Shengtai Wenming).

Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema E-mail to Friend

The Melodious Sound of the Right-Turning Conch: Historiography and Buddhist Counter-Development among Tibetans in China

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

In this talk, we travel upriver from the famous Tibetan Buddhist town of Rebgong in southeastern Qinghai province, China to the small and marginalized Tibetan community of Langmo. Here we explore the stakes and consequences of village history-making as a dialogic process in the context of increasing state-led pressures on rural land use. I had met Langmo elders back in 2005 when I was first looking for highland communities to research. Langmo elders, it turned out, had their own goals for our collaboration. Their counter-development plans for the village meant "capturing" foreign donors and converting them to village patrons. Thus my naive offer in 2008 to help fund Langmo's primary school roof repair drew me into deepening relationships with villagers I had never anticipated. And that meant taking a role as a key listener and medium for elders' oppositional accounts of Langmo history. In the face of resettlement pressures, elders insisted that Langmo's Buddhist history grounded the community's sovereign right to their former lands.

Time: 6:30 pm
Location: Preston E-mail to Friend

Village of Red Hook Municipal Sewer Project

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The Village of Red Hook’s Municipal Sewer Project has been developing for over seventy years. Countless planning documents, initiatives, two failed referendums and the path to final completion will be explored.  The project addresses the Village’s economic development future and protection of drinking water supplies for residents and institutions that rely on the Saw Kill Watershed’s aquifer, tributaries and streams for their own needs.
 
Through the example of a municipal infrastructure project, we will discuss the work involved with gathering and documenting the research, finding the necessary funding, advocating for its necessity, and navigating the bureaucratic and regulatory paperwork required to realize this most important project.
 

Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Recently, Under the Bodhi Tree:  New Female Ordination in Tibetan Buddhism

Thursday, September 28, 2017

This talk will present the speaker’s perceptions and experiences at the recent nuns ordination ceremony, held at the Bodhgaya Mahabodhi Temple in India in March 2017, under the direction of the current H. H. Gyalwa Karmapa.  It will contextualize this exciting event in light of the larger female ordination movement in contemporary Buddhism.

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Hegeman 102 E-mail to Friend

Climate Change and Behavioral Economics: Implications for Policy
 

Thursday, September 14, 2017

We face challenges in dealing with potentially catastrophic events associated with climate change. Most individuals do not think about investing in energy efficient measures to reduce global warming or undertaking protective actions to reduce damage to their homes from future floods or hurricanes until after a disaster occurs. I will use concepts from behavioral economics and psychology to highlight why we ignore these risks and recommend public-private sector partnerships that provide economic incentives for taking steps now rather than waiting until it is too late.
 

Time: 4:40 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema E-mail to Friend

Middle Eastern Studies 
Open House 

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Come celebrate the end of the year with fellow MESers. Meet faculty, hear about exciting new courses, study abroad programs, senior projects, and a number of incredible iniatives MES students are working on. Snacks will be served. All are welcome.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Kline, Faculty Dining Room E-mail to Friend

"Make it New": New Possibilities for Classical Jewish Texts in Scholarship and Culture

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

I. New Connections: The Talmud and the Contemporary Humanities - a Workshop
Location: The Yellow Room in the Campus Center (1:15-4:45pm)

Featuring leading scholars of Jewish studies in dialogue with Bard students and faculty.

II. "Make it New": Classical Jewish Texts and Artistic Imagination
Location: RKC 103 (4:45-6:15pm)

Nicole Krass: Novelist, author of The History of Love (2005) and Great House (2010)
Adam Kirsh: Poet and critic
Galit-Hasan-Rokem: Scholar, poet, and translator.

III. Jewish Studies and the Liberal Arts: Institutional Possibilities
Location: RKC 103 (6:30-7:30pm)

Featuring President Leon Botstein, Bruce Chilton, and Alan Avery-Peck.

Time: 1:15 pm – 7:30 pm
Location: Yellow Room in the campus center and RKC 103 E-mail to Friend

HOW TO BUILD A GIANT TELESCOPE IN THE DESERT (AND MAKE A WORLD): 
A FIELD GUIDE

Monday, April 24, 2017

 The Atacama Desert in northern Chile contains nearly two-thirds of the world’s infrastructure for astronomical data production. In 2012, the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), was under construction. Documenting the extraordinary process of building a radio telescope composed of sixty-six 100-ton antennae, spread out across eighteen kilometers at 16,500 feet in altitude on a plateau in the Chilean Andes-- an anthropologist, a designer, and a camera man spent three weeks filming at ALMA. We will discuss the challenges that emerged in filming and in the subsequent experiments with the collected footage: around the interdisciplinary crafting of narrative; about the limits and possibilities of a range of ethnographic tools; and about the aesthetics of anthropology. 

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

When Social Media are the News

Thursday, April 20, 2017

A decade ago, social media—that is, social network sites like MySpace and Facebook—were taking off among teens and fan communities. News consumption in the US was shifting as well, as cable news outstripped network shows and print circulation declined. Only a few years later, Facebook and Twitter became widespread, perhaps losing their cool among young people. As social media coalesce into a new mass medium, these platforms integrate news stories into spaces previously envisioned for leisure and friendship. Planned changes to the Facebook News Feed algorithm cultivated this process further. By 2015, breaking events like the Charlie Hebdo shooting in Paris unfolded online in a new way, sparking the #JeSuisCharlie hashtag and public memorials across Europe hours later. Reading news websites was already part of daily practice among young people I studied in Berlin in the late 2000s, but by 2015, social media became the place to encounter and experience news stories. This shift is reshaping how the news circulates, facilitating viral “fake” news and disinformation regimes. Social media contribute to reconfiguring the meaning of public and private, but what is at stake when social media are the news?

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 202 E-mail to Friend

Sensorial world of built environments.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Speakers for Anthropology 220: Doing Ethnography.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: TBD E-mail to Friend

God Behind Bars: The Rise of Faith-Based Prison Ministries in an Age of Mass Incarceration

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Tanya Erzen
Associate Professor, University of Puget Sound
Director, Freedom Education Project Puget Sound
In prisons throughout the United States, punitive incarceration and religious revitalization are occurring simultaneously. Faith-based prison ministries operate under the logic that religious conversion and redemption will transform prisoners into new human beings. Why are Christian prison ministries on the rise amidst an increasingly punitive system of mass incarceration? How do people in prison practice religion in a space of coercion and discipline? What are theimplications of the state's promotion of Christianity over other religious traditions in some prisons? And, why have conservative Christians, particularly, embraced criminal justice reform?

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema E-mail to Friend Lecture

The Black Box of Police Torture

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

My talk details the manhunt, arrest, and torture of a convicted cop killer named Andrew Wilson. Wilson was one of approximately 125 Black men who, between 1972 and 1991, were tortured by various means at Chicago’s Area Two police precinct. Beyond these specific dates and outside of this particular location, journalists place the total number of torture survivors at roughly 200.

Given the history of police torture in Chicago, this talk explores the twinned meanings of both the object and concept referred to as the Black Box. Doing so will reveal how the mysterious interworkings of a police torture operation somehow became accepted. Throughout this talk, the Black Box will reference the name of a torture device used to send electronic currents through a person’s body for the purpose of coercing a confession; and it will also refer to the label I give for the conventional agreement, among a group of police officers, to stop trying to understand how and why torture is taking place in their very own precinct. That is to say, during Wilson’s ordeal, the Black Box served as an implicit agreement between police officers that their activity should remain concealed. That is, in attempting to hide the grisly details of their torture operation, these officers designed for themselves a conceptual Black Box. Contained in this box were sweeping, unexamined stereotypes about good and evil, about where and how the evil people live, about the color of the skin of those evil people, and about what it is permissible to do to protect against them.

Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

The Melodious Sound of the Right-Turning Conch: Historiography and Buddhist Counter-Development among Tibetans in China

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

In this talk, we travel upriver from the famous Tibetan Buddhist town of Rebgong in southeastern Qinghai province, China to the small and marginalized Tibetan community of Langmo. Here we explore the stakes and consequences of village history-making as a dialogic process in the context of increasing state-led pressures on rural land use. I had met Langmo elders back in 2005 when I was first looking for highland communities to research. Langmo elders, it turned out, had their own goals for our collaboration. Their counter-development plans for the village meant "capturing" foreign donors and converting them to village patrons. Thus my naive offer in 2008 to help fund Langmo's primary school roof repair drew me into deepening relationships with villagers I had never anticipated. And that meant taking a role as a key listener and medium for elders' oppositional accounts of Langmo history. In the face of resettlement pressures, elders insisted that Langmo's Buddhist history grounded the community's sovereign right to their former lands.

Time: 6:30 pm
Location: Preston E-mail to Friend

When Social Media are the News

Thursday, April 20, 2017

A decade ago, social media—that is, social network sites like MySpace and Facebook—were taking off among teens and fan communities. News consumption in the US was shifting as well, as cable news outstripped network shows and print circulation declined. Only a few years later, Facebook and Twitter became widespread, perhaps losing their cool among young people. As social media coalesce into a new mass medium, these platforms integrate news stories into spaces previously envisioned for leisure and friendship. Planned changes to the Facebook News Feed algorithm cultivated this process further. By 2015, breaking events like the Charlie Hebdo shooting in Paris unfolded online in a new way, sparking the #JeSuisCharlie hashtag and public memorials across Europe hours later. Reading news websites was already part of daily practice among young people I studied in Berlin in the late 2000s, but by 2015, social media became the place to encounter and experience news stories. This shift is reshaping how the news circulates, facilitating viral “fake” news and disinformation regimes. Social media contribute to reconfiguring the meaning of public and private, but what is at stake when social media are the news?

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 202 E-mail to Friend

Sensorial world of built environments.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Speakers for Anthropology 220: Doing Ethnography.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: TBD E-mail to Friend

God Behind Bars: The Rise of Faith-Based Prison Ministries in an Age of Mass Incarceration

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Tanya Erzen
Associate Professor, University of Puget Sound
Director, Freedom Education Project Puget Sound
In prisons throughout the United States, punitive incarceration and religious revitalization are occurring simultaneously. Faith-based prison ministries operate under the logic that religious conversion and redemption will transform prisoners into new human beings. Why are Christian prison ministries on the rise amidst an increasingly punitive system of mass incarceration? How do people in prison practice religion in a space of coercion and discipline? What are theimplications of the state's promotion of Christianity over other religious traditions in some prisons? And, why have conservative Christians, particularly, embraced criminal justice reform?

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema E-mail to Friend Conference

"Make it New": New Possibilities for Classical Jewish Texts in Scholarship and Culture

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

I. New Connections: The Talmud and the Contemporary Humanities - a Workshop
Location: The Yellow Room in the Campus Center (1:15-4:45pm)

Featuring leading scholars of Jewish studies in dialogue with Bard students and faculty.

II. "Make it New": Classical Jewish Texts and Artistic Imagination
Location: RKC 103 (4:45-6:15pm)

Nicole Krass: Novelist, author of The History of Love (2005) and Great House (2010)
Adam Kirsh: Poet and critic
Galit-Hasan-Rokem: Scholar, poet, and translator.

III. Jewish Studies and the Liberal Arts: Institutional Possibilities
Location: RKC 103 (6:30-7:30pm)

Featuring President Leon Botstein, Bruce Chilton, and Alan Avery-Peck.

Time: 1:15 pm – 7:30 pm
Location: Yellow Room in the campus center and RKC 103 E-mail to Friend Lecture

"Loving Liberally: Settling Intimate Accounts in an Expanding American Home"

Thursday, December 8, 2016

A new affective regime is seeping into the workplace through the mandate to “do what you love,” a formulation that encourages workers to approach their job, like their love life, as a passionate pursuit. Based on ethnographic fieldwork exploring living organ donation, polyamory, and intentional community, I argue that this iconic late liberal discourse is returning, full circle, to the home, where people are drawing on the tools of the workplace and market to navigate new kinds of domestic and intimate arrangements that cultivate various forms of love, affection – and labor. This work on home, relationships, and self is ubiquitously characterized by my interlocutors as “exhausting, but worth it.” This talk will examine how – rather than turning the home into the cold, calculating world of markets – the mobilization of transparency, verbal communication, and contracts in practices such as polyamory is put to use in the service of carving out new spaces of care, love, and empathy. With this late liberal toolkit for working from home, these new domestic configurations are reproducing as they disorder the household theorized by classical liberalism and intensifying the centrality of liberal individualism in surprising ways.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Developing America’s Paradise: ‘Foreign’ Investment and Gender in the US Virgin Islands

Monday, December 5, 2016

This talk explores the impact of the Economic Development Commission (EDC) program in the US Virgin Islands and asks, “How do contemporary circulations of capital and people alternately build upon and complicate long-present hierarchies?” This lecture provides an engagement with the EDC, a tax holiday program that has attracted a number of primarily American bankers to the island of St. Croix, as a space in which struggles over quasi-offshore capital produces tensions rooted in race, class, color, gender, and generation. These clashes surrounding ‘appropriate’ financial and social investment have both integrated St. Croix into the global financial services market and produced a great deal of tension between the EDC community and residents of St. Croix. Moreover, the presence of this program has generated new categories of personhood that in turn have sparked new debates about what it means to ‘belong’ in a territory administered by the United States. These new categories of personhood are particularly gendered and alternately destabilize and shore up long-standing hierarchies of generation, gender, and place.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 201 E-mail to Friend


"Saving and Salvation: How Farmers Do Not Hold on to Money in Northeastern Brazil"
 

Thursday, December 1, 2016


The poorest 10% of Brazil's population doubled their incomes between 2001 and 2011. During this time of raging economic growth, a group of small farmers declared that they themselves would not save any money at all. Saving money, they argued, was a vice.

While the farmers were refusing to save, Brazil's government was busy borrowing money to construct Bosla Família, the world's largest national cash welfare program. These seemingly-unrelated events intersected. Together, they changed the way that rural Brazilians handle money, a change that became real with every bill that passed into and out of a farmer's hands.


What does it mean to turn away from saving? This paper considers the saving question as a point of encounter between anthropological exchange theory (Weiner 1992, Levi-Strauss 1949) and classical political economy (Marx 1844)-- and as a sign of the urgent dilemmas of growth today (Li 2014, Tsing 2005, Gens Collective 2015). Not saving money is an everyday habit that turns into a risky, noisy form of critique. It can register one's disagreement with the channels through which money flows, and it can mark out the path that a new channel might follow.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Retrofitting the American Dream: An Ethnography of Suburban Redesign

Thursday, October 27, 2016

 There has been much speculation about the future of the suburban American dream as volatile economic conditions, energy concerns, and climate change make the low-density landscape of single-family homes increasingly unviable. There has been a growing literature on architecture, planning, and policy efforts to reimagine automobile suburbs for a more sustainable future, yet here has been little ethnographic research that explores the transformation of sedimented ideals and ways of being as people’s everyday routines and familiar spaces shift amid efforts to retrofit the material and social landscape of suburbia. Drawing on fieldwork in South Jordan, Utah—one of the fastest growing suburbs in the United States due to the ongoing construction of Daybreak, a massive, master-planned, environmentally friendly, mixed-use transit-oriented community built on reclaimed land once used for mining activities—this talk asks: is a nascent “new normal” emerging out of the environmental limitations, “cruel optimism,” and segregationist design of the postwar American dream? Given that Daybreak was designed and first developed by a land development subsidiary of one of the largest mining companies in the world, this talk sheds light on the formation of new subjectivies and new regimes of governance at the intersection of sustainable urbanism, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and social justice concerns.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

"The Archive of the Archive: An Ontology of Indigenous Sound Recordings"

Monday, September 26, 2016

In this paper I examine the documentary trail of legal agreements, memoranda, correspondence, and contracts that mark the history of the “Laura Boulton Collection’s” acquisition by Columbia University as intellectual property, and the subsequent distribution and management of the associated rights by Columbia, Indiana University, and the Library of Congress. My argument is that this hidden "archive of the archive” provides the necessary context for understanding what “the archive” is. While the ostensible motivation for this construction was scientific and scholarly, I show that every actor in the story had a covert economic interest in the fiction that the collection was a unitary object that could be owned, sold, or transferred in the name of science.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Making Archaeology Work in the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Much discussion on historical memory in Palestine-Israel has focused on the political appropriation of archaeological material in the creation of narratives relating to nationalist interests and colonial settlement. The appropriation of archaeology has been traced by foundational texts such as Whitelam (1996), Abu El-Haj (2001), and Finkelstein & Silberman (2001), which in turn have informed often-polarized debates within and outside the discipline. This work has established the political capital in harnessing archaeological narratives in Palestine-Israel, in particular their role in the construction of claims to land and to history over the course of the 20th century. However, in the post-9/11, post-Bush, post-Second Intifada worlds, archaeology finds itself in a very different political, academic - and physical - landscape. The reality on the ground has changed. What kinds of archaeologies have emerged from the changed historical conditions of the last fifteen years? How does archaeology now inhabit those changed conditions?

This seminar discusses a joint Columbia University-Birzeit University Museum Anthropology project in the West Bank town of Shuqba, in the Wadi en-Natuf. The Wadi en-Natuf is currently undergoing a process of destructive landscape alteration, partly through Israeli settlement and road construction, and partly through the large scale dumping and burning of (possibly toxic) industrial and municipal wastes by Israeli and Palestinian agencies. In the face of all this, the local community and archaeologists (faculty and students) are making archaeology work: landscape survey, oral histories/memory maps, and museum/heritage initiatives.

Time: 6:15 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Coloniality and the Semiotics of Racialization in Latin America: The Peruvian Case

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Negotiations of an individual’s racial positioning, consisting of evaluations of co-occurring emblems such as occupation and descent, for example, in addition to skin color, have been a mainstay feature of colonial and post-colonial societies. Such negotiations, through events of performance and decoding of sign-markers, serve to (re)produce racial categories and to solidify the valence of emblematic racial types over time, even when the perceivable emblems themselves have changed. Tracking shifts and continuities in Peruvian racial ideologies from the colonial period to the present, this survey will move chronologically through a series of case studies, considering their impact on identity formation across Peruvian history, grounding them in contemporary examples.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Dormant Law: The Politics of Russian Language Film Showings in Georgia

Monday, February 29, 2016

In 2011, a law was implemented in Georgia that required all foreign films to be shown with Georgian state language dubbing or subtitling. At the time, Russian was the default language of film showings. The largest movie theater in Tbilisi was fined a year later for showing Russian films, but this had little effect on film showing practices. In this talk, I describe how media language politics involved collaboration among social actors in the Georgian Ministry of Culture, the movie theater industry, and the film dubbing industry. I develop the concept of dormant law to describe how an unenforced, aspirational law can exist as a form of latent, activatable politics. In political and popular discourse at the time, social actors framed Russian as an infrastructurally embedded and potentially hazardous symbolic resource, whereas they framed English as either harmless or enriching to Georgianness. In film language debates, citizens and politicians reflected on the meanings of “international” languages, in contrast with Georgian. The Film Law manifested a hierarchy of social value in which English and Russian were competing codes, iconic of possible future Georgian modernities.  

Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Olin LC 120 E-mail to Friend

Shocking Pink and on the Street:
Aesthetics of Queer Protest in São Paulo, Brazil

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Recently, the Brazilian public has been inundated with images of mass protest crowds, presenting demands across the political spectrum. These images have come to symbolize Brazilians' uncertainties around a slowing economy, dissatisfaction with elected politicians, and cultural polarization around reproductive and sexual rights. This presentation considers a number of high-profile protests in the city of São Paulo that took place between 2011 and 2013. The talk draws on sustained ethnographic fieldwork within overlapping networks of LGBT activists that mobilized for federal anti-discrimination protections, where I analyzed anti-homophobia and anti-transphobia discourses that circulated between street protests, government reports, and journalists' accounts. During this time, LGBT activists held their own events and joined in protest marches led by organizers for marijuana decriminalization, free public transit, against police violence, and political corruption. Examining protests as sites of oppositional public address as well as experimental spaces for alternative social relations, I focus on rhetorical, aesthetic and affective registers of protest actions. Analyzing palavras de ordem (protest chants), the block colors of the crowd, and interactions with the built environment, I demonstrate how protests make social movements recognizable across multiple contexts.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin LC 120 E-mail to Friend

Security Society in Gaza:
Police Encounters under Egyptian Rule

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

This talk explores the dynamics of policing and security in the Gaza Strip during the period of Egyptian Administration (1948-67). Drawing on a rich and detailed archive, it tracks a range of police encounters. Many such encounters were mundane, including investigation of petty crime. Many were evidently repressive, including the surveillance of political activity and speech. All were part of a broad security milieu that helped to define governance, political action, and life possibilities in Gaza in the years after the loss of Palestine. The analytic lens of “security society” illuminates how policing both operated as a mechanism of governance and control and provided opportunities for action and effect. Criminality, politics, and propriety were all matters of concern for the police and the Gazan public. 

Time: 6:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Remains of an American Dreamworld

Thursday, February 4, 2016

This paper explores the afterlives of analog photography in Rochester, New York, where Eastman-Kodak has been based for over a century. While there is still some film being made in Rochester, Kodak no longer fuels the regional economy or produces the bulk of the nation’s photographs. Business journals often cite digital imaging as the reason for Kodak’s decline, but this paper will consider the obsolescence of chemical photography through the matter of chemistry itself. As historians of science have argued and the case of Kodak suggests, obsolescence is always intertwined with industrial chemistry because the later is premised on the substitution of synthetic materials for natural resources. Just as roll film replaced the glass plates used to make photographs in the 19th century, Kodak scientists continuously devised ever cheaper and more light-sensitive films, obsolescing earlier products in the process. How might thinking with chemistry reframe ideas of obsolescence and the contradictions between linear narratives of progress, repetitive loops of boom and bust, and the long-term, accretive side effects of industrial production? I draw on archival and ethnographic research to explore the ethical worlds and styles of capitalism that emerged around chemical photography and that made film possible. I attend to the durative qualities and physical properties of chemicals and images to theorize how the affective, ecological, and aesthetic traces chemical photography continue to shape Rochester today.
 In 2005, Ali Feser graduated from Bard College, where she wrote her senior project on digital media and political affect in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. She is currently a doctoral candidate in Anthropology at the University of Chicago and is halfway through two years of fieldwork on the history and afterlives of chemical photography in Rochester, New York.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Angela Daley

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Measuring poverty and inequality in northern
Canada
and
The Well-Being of Adolescents in Northern Canada

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Olin LC 118 E-mail to Friend

Andy Barenberg

Monday, January 11, 2016

Early childhood stunting has been known to be an indicator of cognitive developmental stunting. What is the relationship between early childhood stunting and later educational outcomes? To answer this question, I examine matched pairs of siblings who differ in their third trimester in-utero exposure to the Tanzania hunger season. Using multiple placebo groups, I create falsification tests to show that congenital stunting is driving the effects on educational outcome. Additionally, I test for possible impacts of household heterogeneity, selective mortality, and sibling investment spillovers.  My results find that a standard deviation increase in under-five stunting decreases years of education completed by approximately one grade level. 

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Olin LC 118 E-mail to Friend Film

Film Screening: Are You Listening!

Thursday, October 13, 2016

An award-winning documentary film revealing the effects of climate change on the coastal village of Sutarkhali, Bangladesh in the wake of a cyclone induced tidal surge. The film's world premier was as the 'Curtain Opener' for the 55th DOK festival in Leipzig Germany in 2012. Screening is for ANTH/EUS 223 Conservation Anthropology.

Time: 3:10 pm – 4:40 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

PEEP!

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Students Grace Calderly and Lian Ladia curate a selection of short films focused on "the insider looking or in" and the return of the gaze in the idea of peep cinema. This film program is the students final project for Curating Cinema at CCS Bard.

Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Special Screening of Edward S. Curtis's Landmark Silent Film
"In the Land of the Head Hunters" (1914)

Thursday, March 3, 2016

In 1914, American photographer Edward S. Curtis released the first feature-length, silent, fiction film to star an entirely indigenous cast. In the Land of the Head Hunters—an epic melodrama of love, war, sorcery and ritual—was made with the Kwakwaka’wakw (Kwakiutl) people on location in British Columbia, and its premiers in Seattle and New York were accompanied by a live rendition of the original musical score written for the film by John J. Braham, best known for his work arranging Gilbert and Sullivan in the US. Though partially restored in the early 1970s (and released as In the Land of the War Canoes), the original has been completely inaccessible and overlooked by film history. Join Aaron Glass for a special screening and discussion of the newly restored film, which has returned the film’s original title, inter-title cards, long-missing footage, color tinting, initial publicity graphics, and musical score—now thought to be the earliest extant original feature-length film score in American history.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Ottaway Theater (Avery)
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Black in Latin America Film Series

Thursday, February 25, 2016

We will screen the Black in Latin America film about the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Dinner and discussion will be part of the event. Co-hosted by Spanish Studies Program, BEOP Club, LASO, BSO and La Voz

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Multipurpose Room E-mail to Friend a Panel and Discussion

"Loving Liberally: Settling Intimate Accounts in an Expanding American Home"

Thursday, December 8, 2016

A new affective regime is seeping into the workplace through the mandate to “do what you love,” a formulation that encourages workers to approach their job, like their love life, as a passionate pursuit. Based on ethnographic fieldwork exploring living organ donation, polyamory, and intentional community, I argue that this iconic late liberal discourse is returning, full circle, to the home, where people are drawing on the tools of the workplace and market to navigate new kinds of domestic and intimate arrangements that cultivate various forms of love, affection – and labor. This work on home, relationships, and self is ubiquitously characterized by my interlocutors as “exhausting, but worth it.” This talk will examine how – rather than turning the home into the cold, calculating world of markets – the mobilization of transparency, verbal communication, and contracts in practices such as polyamory is put to use in the service of carving out new spaces of care, love, and empathy. With this late liberal toolkit for working from home, these new domestic configurations are reproducing as they disorder the household theorized by classical liberalism and intensifying the centrality of liberal individualism in surprising ways.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Developing America’s Paradise: ‘Foreign’ Investment and Gender in the US Virgin Islands

Monday, December 5, 2016

This talk explores the impact of the Economic Development Commission (EDC) program in the US Virgin Islands and asks, “How do contemporary circulations of capital and people alternately build upon and complicate long-present hierarchies?” This lecture provides an engagement with the EDC, a tax holiday program that has attracted a number of primarily American bankers to the island of St. Croix, as a space in which struggles over quasi-offshore capital produces tensions rooted in race, class, color, gender, and generation. These clashes surrounding ‘appropriate’ financial and social investment have both integrated St. Croix into the global financial services market and produced a great deal of tension between the EDC community and residents of St. Croix. Moreover, the presence of this program has generated new categories of personhood that in turn have sparked new debates about what it means to ‘belong’ in a territory administered by the United States. These new categories of personhood are particularly gendered and alternately destabilize and shore up long-standing hierarchies of generation, gender, and place.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 201 E-mail to Friend


"Saving and Salvation: How Farmers Do Not Hold on to Money in Northeastern Brazil"
 

Thursday, December 1, 2016


The poorest 10% of Brazil's population doubled their incomes between 2001 and 2011. During this time of raging economic growth, a group of small farmers declared that they themselves would not save any money at all. Saving money, they argued, was a vice.

While the farmers were refusing to save, Brazil's government was busy borrowing money to construct Bosla Família, the world's largest national cash welfare program. These seemingly-unrelated events intersected. Together, they changed the way that rural Brazilians handle money, a change that became real with every bill that passed into and out of a farmer's hands.


What does it mean to turn away from saving? This paper considers the saving question as a point of encounter between anthropological exchange theory (Weiner 1992, Levi-Strauss 1949) and classical political economy (Marx 1844)-- and as a sign of the urgent dilemmas of growth today (Li 2014, Tsing 2005, Gens Collective 2015). Not saving money is an everyday habit that turns into a risky, noisy form of critique. It can register one's disagreement with the channels through which money flows, and it can mark out the path that a new channel might follow.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Retrofitting the American Dream: An Ethnography of Suburban Redesign

Thursday, October 27, 2016

 There has been much speculation about the future of the suburban American dream as volatile economic conditions, energy concerns, and climate change make the low-density landscape of single-family homes increasingly unviable. There has been a growing literature on architecture, planning, and policy efforts to reimagine automobile suburbs for a more sustainable future, yet here has been little ethnographic research that explores the transformation of sedimented ideals and ways of being as people’s everyday routines and familiar spaces shift amid efforts to retrofit the material and social landscape of suburbia. Drawing on fieldwork in South Jordan, Utah—one of the fastest growing suburbs in the United States due to the ongoing construction of Daybreak, a massive, master-planned, environmentally friendly, mixed-use transit-oriented community built on reclaimed land once used for mining activities—this talk asks: is a nascent “new normal” emerging out of the environmental limitations, “cruel optimism,” and segregationist design of the postwar American dream? Given that Daybreak was designed and first developed by a land development subsidiary of one of the largest mining companies in the world, this talk sheds light on the formation of new subjectivies and new regimes of governance at the intersection of sustainable urbanism, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and social justice concerns.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Film Screening: Are You Listening!

Thursday, October 13, 2016

An award-winning documentary film revealing the effects of climate change on the coastal village of Sutarkhali, Bangladesh in the wake of a cyclone induced tidal surge. The film's world premier was as the 'Curtain Opener' for the 55th DOK festival in Leipzig Germany in 2012. Screening is for ANTH/EUS 223 Conservation Anthropology.

Time: 3:10 pm – 4:40 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Black Lives Matter:
Anthropological Perspectives

Thursday, September 29, 2016

How does anthropological thinking help us make sense of the recent Black Lives Matter movement?  How have anthropologists spoken about this movement as part of their research or as engaged citizens?  What kinds of new questions does BLM raise about the politics of race and protest movements in on and offline worlds?  In this panel, both faculty and students from the anthropology program will speak briefly about their interpretations and questions that relate to the Black Lives Matter movement to generate a broader conversation in dialogue with anthropological perspectives.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

"The Archive of the Archive: An Ontology of Indigenous Sound Recordings"

Monday, September 26, 2016

In this paper I examine the documentary trail of legal agreements, memoranda, correspondence, and contracts that mark the history of the “Laura Boulton Collection’s” acquisition by Columbia University as intellectual property, and the subsequent distribution and management of the associated rights by Columbia, Indiana University, and the Library of Congress. My argument is that this hidden "archive of the archive” provides the necessary context for understanding what “the archive” is. While the ostensible motivation for this construction was scientific and scholarly, I show that every actor in the story had a covert economic interest in the fiction that the collection was a unitary object that could be owned, sold, or transferred in the name of science.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Spectatorship in an Age of Surveillance

Tuesday, September 20, 2016 – Friday, September 23, 2016

From September 20 to 23, Bard College will host a series of events on the theme of spectatorship in an age of surveillance. Artist Trevor Paglen will give a public artist talk on the evening of Tuesday, September 20. This will be followed by a two-day public symposium on the evening of Thursday, September 22 and throughout the day on Friday, September 23, in which invited artists and scholars, as well as artists and scholars from the Bard community, will present work-in-progress and current research as part of a shared inquiry into the nature of spectatorship, privacy, and identity in the context of surveillance culture.

Time: 7:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Fisher Center
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

PEEP!

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Students Grace Calderly and Lian Ladia curate a selection of short films focused on "the insider looking or in" and the return of the gaze in the idea of peep cinema. This film program is the students final project for Curating Cinema at CCS Bard.

Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and its Ironies- A talk with David Rieff

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

David Rieff is the author of many books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West, A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis, and, most recently, The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the 21st Century. He lives in New York City.In his Book "In Praise of Forgetting", He poses hard questions about whether remembrance ever truly has, or indeed ever could, “inoculate” the present against repeating the crimes of the past. He argues that rubbing raw historical wounds—whether self-inflicted or imposed by outside forces—neither remedies injustice nor confers reconciliation. If he is right, then historical memory is not a moral imperative but rather a moral option—sometimes called for, sometimes not. Collective remembrance can be toxic. Sometimes, Rieff concludes, it may be more moral to forget.Ranging widely across some of the defining conflicts of modern times—the Irish Troubles and the Easter Uprising of 1916, the white settlement of Australia, the American Civil War, the Balkan wars, the Holocaust, and 9/11—Rieff presents a pellucid examination of the uses and abuses of historical memory. His contentious, brilliant, and elegant essay is an indispensable work of moral philosophy.We Hope to see you there!!

Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Religion, witchcraft, magic and kinship in former colonies of Great Britain and Portugal

Monday, April 18, 2016

Peter is a scholar, social commentator and public intellectual with an unusual range of research experience. Born in England and educated at Cambridge University, his career has taken him to Southern Africa and to Brazil, where he has lived and taught for forty years. He is one of Brazil’s most distinguished anthropologists, a former Vice-President of the Brazilian Association of Anthropologists, and editor of the leading anthropological journal Vibrant.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 201 E-mail to Friend

Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice

Friday, April 8, 2016

Friday, April 8 @Blum

9am Prelude
Georgian Polyphony Workshop with Carl Linich

10am  Aurality
A panel discussion with Tomie Hahn (RPI), Brian Hochman (Georgetown University), Julianne Swartz (Bard College), & Amanda Weidman (Bryn Mawr College)
Chaired by Alex Benson (Bard College0

11:30am  Interlude
Physics of Sound with Matthew Deady
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

1:00pm  Transmission
A panal discussion with Masha Godovannaya (Smolny College), Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Drew Thompson (Bard College0, and Olga Touloumi (Bard College0
Chaired by Danielle Riou (Bard College)

2:30pm Interlude
Oral History Workshop with Suzanne Snider
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

3:30pm  Resonance
A panel discussion with Marie Abe (Boston University), Emilio Distretti (Al-Quds), Erica Robles-Anderson (NYU), Maria Sonevytsky (Bard College), & David Suisman (University of Delaware)
Chaired by Laura Kunreuther

5:00pm  Deep Listening Workshop
with Pauline Oliveros

6:00pm  Closing Remarks
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 

Time: 9:00 am
Location: Blum
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Thursday, April 7 @Bito

2:30pm Opening Lecture
Emily Thompson (Princeton University)
Sound Theory as Sound Practice

4pm  Exhinition Opening
Featuring work by Lesley Flanigan, Tristan Perich, Natalia Fedorova, and Bard College faculty and students

5:30pm Keynote Lecture
Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in
Culture & Technology, McGill University
Audile Scarification:
Notes on the Normalization of Hearing Damage
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 

Time: 2:30 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó '60 Conservatory Building
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Making Archaeology Work in the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Much discussion on historical memory in Palestine-Israel has focused on the political appropriation of archaeological material in the creation of narratives relating to nationalist interests and colonial settlement. The appropriation of archaeology has been traced by foundational texts such as Whitelam (1996), Abu El-Haj (2001), and Finkelstein & Silberman (2001), which in turn have informed often-polarized debates within and outside the discipline. This work has established the political capital in harnessing archaeological narratives in Palestine-Israel, in particular their role in the construction of claims to land and to history over the course of the 20th century. However, in the post-9/11, post-Bush, post-Second Intifada worlds, archaeology finds itself in a very different political, academic - and physical - landscape. The reality on the ground has changed. What kinds of archaeologies have emerged from the changed historical conditions of the last fifteen years? How does archaeology now inhabit those changed conditions?

This seminar discusses a joint Columbia University-Birzeit University Museum Anthropology project in the West Bank town of Shuqba, in the Wadi en-Natuf. The Wadi en-Natuf is currently undergoing a process of destructive landscape alteration, partly through Israeli settlement and road construction, and partly through the large scale dumping and burning of (possibly toxic) industrial and municipal wastes by Israeli and Palestinian agencies. In the face of all this, the local community and archaeologists (faculty and students) are making archaeology work: landscape survey, oral histories/memory maps, and museum/heritage initiatives.

Time: 6:15 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Coloniality and the Semiotics of Racialization in Latin America: The Peruvian Case

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Negotiations of an individual’s racial positioning, consisting of evaluations of co-occurring emblems such as occupation and descent, for example, in addition to skin color, have been a mainstay feature of colonial and post-colonial societies. Such negotiations, through events of performance and decoding of sign-markers, serve to (re)produce racial categories and to solidify the valence of emblematic racial types over time, even when the perceivable emblems themselves have changed. Tracking shifts and continuities in Peruvian racial ideologies from the colonial period to the present, this survey will move chronologically through a series of case studies, considering their impact on identity formation across Peruvian history, grounding them in contemporary examples.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Special Screening of Edward S. Curtis's Landmark Silent Film
"In the Land of the Head Hunters" (1914)

Thursday, March 3, 2016

In 1914, American photographer Edward S. Curtis released the first feature-length, silent, fiction film to star an entirely indigenous cast. In the Land of the Head Hunters—an epic melodrama of love, war, sorcery and ritual—was made with the Kwakwaka’wakw (Kwakiutl) people on location in British Columbia, and its premiers in Seattle and New York were accompanied by a live rendition of the original musical score written for the film by John J. Braham, best known for his work arranging Gilbert and Sullivan in the US. Though partially restored in the early 1970s (and released as In the Land of the War Canoes), the original has been completely inaccessible and overlooked by film history. Join Aaron Glass for a special screening and discussion of the newly restored film, which has returned the film’s original title, inter-title cards, long-missing footage, color tinting, initial publicity graphics, and musical score—now thought to be the earliest extant original feature-length film score in American history.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Ottaway Theater (Avery)
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Dormant Law: The Politics of Russian Language Film Showings in Georgia

Monday, February 29, 2016

In 2011, a law was implemented in Georgia that required all foreign films to be shown with Georgian state language dubbing or subtitling. At the time, Russian was the default language of film showings. The largest movie theater in Tbilisi was fined a year later for showing Russian films, but this had little effect on film showing practices. In this talk, I describe how media language politics involved collaboration among social actors in the Georgian Ministry of Culture, the movie theater industry, and the film dubbing industry. I develop the concept of dormant law to describe how an unenforced, aspirational law can exist as a form of latent, activatable politics. In political and popular discourse at the time, social actors framed Russian as an infrastructurally embedded and potentially hazardous symbolic resource, whereas they framed English as either harmless or enriching to Georgianness. In film language debates, citizens and politicians reflected on the meanings of “international” languages, in contrast with Georgian. The Film Law manifested a hierarchy of social value in which English and Russian were competing codes, iconic of possible future Georgian modernities.  

Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Olin LC 120 E-mail to Friend

Black in Latin America Film Series

Thursday, February 25, 2016

We will screen the Black in Latin America film about the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Dinner and discussion will be part of the event. Co-hosted by Spanish Studies Program, BEOP Club, LASO, BSO and La Voz

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Multipurpose Room E-mail to Friend

Shocking Pink and on the Street:
Aesthetics of Queer Protest in São Paulo, Brazil

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Recently, the Brazilian public has been inundated with images of mass protest crowds, presenting demands across the political spectrum. These images have come to symbolize Brazilians' uncertainties around a slowing economy, dissatisfaction with elected politicians, and cultural polarization around reproductive and sexual rights. This presentation considers a number of high-profile protests in the city of São Paulo that took place between 2011 and 2013. The talk draws on sustained ethnographic fieldwork within overlapping networks of LGBT activists that mobilized for federal anti-discrimination protections, where I analyzed anti-homophobia and anti-transphobia discourses that circulated between street protests, government reports, and journalists' accounts. During this time, LGBT activists held their own events and joined in protest marches led by organizers for marijuana decriminalization, free public transit, against police violence, and political corruption. Examining protests as sites of oppositional public address as well as experimental spaces for alternative social relations, I focus on rhetorical, aesthetic and affective registers of protest actions. Analyzing palavras de ordem (protest chants), the block colors of the crowd, and interactions with the built environment, I demonstrate how protests make social movements recognizable across multiple contexts.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin LC 120 E-mail to Friend

Security Society in Gaza:
Police Encounters under Egyptian Rule

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

This talk explores the dynamics of policing and security in the Gaza Strip during the period of Egyptian Administration (1948-67). Drawing on a rich and detailed archive, it tracks a range of police encounters. Many such encounters were mundane, including investigation of petty crime. Many were evidently repressive, including the surveillance of political activity and speech. All were part of a broad security milieu that helped to define governance, political action, and life possibilities in Gaza in the years after the loss of Palestine. The analytic lens of “security society” illuminates how policing both operated as a mechanism of governance and control and provided opportunities for action and effect. Criminality, politics, and propriety were all matters of concern for the police and the Gazan public. 

Time: 6:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Remains of an American Dreamworld

Thursday, February 4, 2016

This paper explores the afterlives of analog photography in Rochester, New York, where Eastman-Kodak has been based for over a century. While there is still some film being made in Rochester, Kodak no longer fuels the regional economy or produces the bulk of the nation’s photographs. Business journals often cite digital imaging as the reason for Kodak’s decline, but this paper will consider the obsolescence of chemical photography through the matter of chemistry itself. As historians of science have argued and the case of Kodak suggests, obsolescence is always intertwined with industrial chemistry because the later is premised on the substitution of synthetic materials for natural resources. Just as roll film replaced the glass plates used to make photographs in the 19th century, Kodak scientists continuously devised ever cheaper and more light-sensitive films, obsolescing earlier products in the process. How might thinking with chemistry reframe ideas of obsolescence and the contradictions between linear narratives of progress, repetitive loops of boom and bust, and the long-term, accretive side effects of industrial production? I draw on archival and ethnographic research to explore the ethical worlds and styles of capitalism that emerged around chemical photography and that made film possible. I attend to the durative qualities and physical properties of chemicals and images to theorize how the affective, ecological, and aesthetic traces chemical photography continue to shape Rochester today.
 In 2005, Ali Feser graduated from Bard College, where she wrote her senior project on digital media and political affect in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. She is currently a doctoral candidate in Anthropology at the University of Chicago and is halfway through two years of fieldwork on the history and afterlives of chemical photography in Rochester, New York.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Angela Daley

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Measuring poverty and inequality in northern
Canada
and
The Well-Being of Adolescents in Northern Canada

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Olin LC 118 E-mail to Friend

Andy Barenberg

Monday, January 11, 2016

Early childhood stunting has been known to be an indicator of cognitive developmental stunting. What is the relationship between early childhood stunting and later educational outcomes? To answer this question, I examine matched pairs of siblings who differ in their third trimester in-utero exposure to the Tanzania hunger season. Using multiple placebo groups, I create falsification tests to show that congenital stunting is driving the effects on educational outcome. Additionally, I test for possible impacts of household heterogeneity, selective mortality, and sibling investment spillovers.  My results find that a standard deviation increase in under-five stunting decreases years of education completed by approximately one grade level. 

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Olin LC 118 E-mail to Friend Conference

Spectatorship in an Age of Surveillance

Tuesday, September 20, 2016 – Friday, September 23, 2016

From September 20 to 23, Bard College will host a series of events on the theme of spectatorship in an age of surveillance. Artist Trevor Paglen will give a public artist talk on the evening of Tuesday, September 20. This will be followed by a two-day public symposium on the evening of Thursday, September 22 and throughout the day on Friday, September 23, in which invited artists and scholars, as well as artists and scholars from the Bard community, will present work-in-progress and current research as part of a shared inquiry into the nature of spectatorship, privacy, and identity in the context of surveillance culture.

Time: 7:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Fisher Center
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Discussion

In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and its Ironies- A talk with David Rieff

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

David Rieff is the author of many books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West, A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis, and, most recently, The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the 21st Century. He lives in New York City.In his Book "In Praise of Forgetting", He poses hard questions about whether remembrance ever truly has, or indeed ever could, “inoculate” the present against repeating the crimes of the past. He argues that rubbing raw historical wounds—whether self-inflicted or imposed by outside forces—neither remedies injustice nor confers reconciliation. If he is right, then historical memory is not a moral imperative but rather a moral option—sometimes called for, sometimes not. Collective remembrance can be toxic. Sometimes, Rieff concludes, it may be more moral to forget.Ranging widely across some of the defining conflicts of modern times—the Irish Troubles and the Easter Uprising of 1916, the white settlement of Australia, the American Civil War, the Balkan wars, the Holocaust, and 9/11—Rieff presents a pellucid examination of the uses and abuses of historical memory. His contentious, brilliant, and elegant essay is an indispensable work of moral philosophy.We Hope to see you there!!

Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Bard Event

Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice

Friday, April 8, 2016

Friday, April 8 @Blum

9am Prelude
Georgian Polyphony Workshop with Carl Linich

10am  Aurality
A panel discussion with Tomie Hahn (RPI), Brian Hochman (Georgetown University), Julianne Swartz (Bard College), & Amanda Weidman (Bryn Mawr College)
Chaired by Alex Benson (Bard College0

11:30am  Interlude
Physics of Sound with Matthew Deady
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

1:00pm  Transmission
A panal discussion with Masha Godovannaya (Smolny College), Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Drew Thompson (Bard College0, and Olga Touloumi (Bard College0
Chaired by Danielle Riou (Bard College)

2:30pm Interlude
Oral History Workshop with Suzanne Snider
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

3:30pm  Resonance
A panel discussion with Marie Abe (Boston University), Emilio Distretti (Al-Quds), Erica Robles-Anderson (NYU), Maria Sonevytsky (Bard College), & David Suisman (University of Delaware)
Chaired by Laura Kunreuther

5:00pm  Deep Listening Workshop
with Pauline Oliveros

6:00pm  Closing Remarks
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 

Time: 9:00 am
Location: Blum
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Lecture

Effervescent Publics: Ancestral Liberation and Pollution in a Digital Age

Thursday, December 3, 2015

This paper approaches climate change as a long-standing political struggle from below, rather than a new crisis to be solved by scientific expertise, corporate accountability, or governmental efficiency from above. I examine how the urban poor in South Africa manage air pollution that is at once chemical, spiritual, and technological. I focus on a tension between breathing and being unable to breathe, a characteristic state in historically segregated townships and shack settlements. A key practice mediating these states is what residents refer to as “coughing out” (ukubhodla in isiZulu). Ukubhodla is when you clear your lungs to breathe – whether to sing, pray, or speak to ancestors – in effervescent collective space. The local and global networks produced, in spite of their fleeting and ephemeral qualities, give substance to public solidarity between residents. Broadly, I argue that breathing, the most taken-for-granted of human activities, is a highly differentiated practice. As the first and the last gesture of politics, breathing embodies innovative challenges by the urban poor to climate change consensus.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

When Shelter Becomes Exposure: Everyday chemical encounters and the substantiation of the surreal in late industrialism

Thursday, November 5, 2015

The formaldehyde-based resins of pressed woods are an overlooked, yet foundational, agent in the homemaking and technological dreamworlds of mid-20th century America and continue to undergird much of the comfort, security, and affordability of the modern home. I ethnographically track formaldehyde from the shale pores from which its precursor is siphoned, a mile below the earth’s surface, to abandoned homes decomposing into the rural landscape—its formaldehyde stores almost entirely sublimated into the atmosphere. This paper asks, what does the good life look like in an engineered world that subsidizes our standard of living while ever-so-slowly smothering us.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Reproductive Rights and Responsibilities:
The production of ethical subjects in Mexico City's new public abortion program

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Abortion clinics in Mexico City’s new public abortion program do more than provide medical care: they function as venues for the production of ethical subjects of the modern Mexican state. My dissertation examines how a central yet unexposed dimension of public abortion care involves “responsibilization”, a governing technique deployed increasingly in advanced neoliberal democracies (Rose 2000).  Within the public program, begun in 2007, abortion is treated as the result of careless sexual decision-making; clinicians regularly enjoin patients to be more responsible. Invocations of individual responsibility detach abortion from social and structural context such that it emerges as a moral problem of individuals needing ethical reconstitution. Responsibilization is indicative of broader transformations in “reproductive governance” unfolding throughout Latin America alongside the incorporation of neoliberal economic policies and logics that emphasize self-sufficiency (Morgan and Roberts 2012). These changes have important consequences for citizenship. Based on eighteen months of ethnographic research in Mexico City abortion clinics, including interviews with patients and staff, I argue that the program produces sexually (ir)responsible subjects instead of the empowered citizens that feminists and policy-makers had imagined with abortion reform. This moralizing context prevents the internalization of abortion rights, an element I conceptualize as central to reproductive citizenship.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Rendering Responsibility:
State Imaginaries and the Movements against the Vietnam and Iraq Wars

Monday, May 4, 2015

The movement against the Vietnam War began modestly, but grew in both size and intensity as the years and the war dragged on. The movement against the Iraq War, in contrast, came together quickly and massively in the space of months and then largely receded from public view. Although the presence (and then absence) of the draft is often invoked as an explanation for the different trajectories of these movements, military recruitment practices are not the most important thing to have changed since the Vietnam era. Drawing on original archival work, this talk will trace how basic understandings of the nature of the state and citizenship (what I call “state imaginaries”) have also changed, and argue that this had profound consequences for antiwar activism in each moment by shaping how and where activists located responsibility for war.

Time: 1:30 pm
Location: RKC 102B E-mail to Friend

Omar Tesdell: Nature Reserves, Territory, and the Question of Palestinian Cultivation

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Beginning mid-nineteenth century, first French and Ottoman officials, and later British officials set aside significant tracts of land for environmental conservation in the Arab world. The convention was continued under subsequent Jordanian administration of the West Bank. In fact, nature areas remain one of the largest classifications of land in the Palestinian West Bank today, covering more than 30 official reserves, or about 5 percent of the land area. This little-known legacy reveals the enduring and contested status of protected conservation areas in Historic Palestine. Recent scholarship on the topic has elucidated the establishment of forest and nature reserves in Palestine and connections with other British colonial sites. However, little is known about the relationship between conservation programs and affected Palestinians. This paper explores the contested status of protected areas through the articulation of official conservation programs and Palestinian cultivation practice in the West Bank.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin 304 E-mail to Friend

Open Sounds, Hidden Spaces: Listening, Wandering, and Spatial Formation in Sufi Iran

Thursday, April 9, 2015

As the Iranian authorities continue to frown upon public gatherings, Sufi Orders have sought alternative methods of convening while still complying with city regulations. One informal Sufi group in the city of Isfahan does so by meeting in private homes and rotating locations each week. Rather than circulate the specific address of a meeting place, however, the mystics instead instruct the others to meet at a nearby intersection, and then broadcast music from a courtyard or house to alert the members to the exact location. This in turn allows them to locate the site by listening for and ultimately “following” the sounds. It is in this way that the Sufis utilize the practice of intentional listening (sama) and mystical ideals of wandering to navigate the politics of Iranian urban space. This talk will hence examine the utilization of mystical epistemologies to lead to the emergence of an alternative Islamic space in post-revolutionary Iran.
 

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 101 E-mail to Friend

The Rickshaw and the Policeman: Zulu Men, Work and Clothing in Colonial Natal

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

This paper will explore the two careers of rickshaw puller and policeman through the lens of clothing since the rickshaw pullers were often spectacularly dressed in “costumes” that echoed “Zulu” aesthetics while the policeman was stripped of such excess and given a suit and various other articles of clothing made of worsted wool. As photographic subjects, the rickshaw and the policeman seem to be polar opposites and yet many men seem to have cycled through both careers. The paper will also explore how the very notion of a “career” was established specifically for Zulu men and how forms of work as diverse as child caring and laundering were all tied together by assumptions that were made about the expendability of Zulu bodies. Needless to say, even the term “Zulu” is used advisedly since there was as much wishful thinking and fantasy on the part of photographers as there was a tangible reality that can be termed “Zuluness”.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: RKC 115 E-mail to Friend

Sound and Affect Lecture Series

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Avery Art Center, Center for Film, Electronic Arts and Music E-mail to Friend

"Anthropology, Photography and the Field of Memory: Images from South Sudan"

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Patti Langton, a British anthropologist and documentary film-maker, lived in Sudan 1979-1980 with the Larim (or Boya) people, cattle pastoralists whose homeland lies near South Sudan’s borders with Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia.

Her remarkable photographic and sound archive has recently been acquired by the Pitt-Rivers Museum in Oxford, where she is a Research Associate. The photographs document the lives of a remote people on the eve of war, the prolonged period of national conflict that has since engulfed the Larim and other communities in South Sudan.

Patti Langton will discuss the fate of these images form creation to curation, from the moment of taking the photograph to its afterlife in a museum.

Time: 6:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend a Faculty Seminar

Effervescent Publics: Ancestral Liberation and Pollution in a Digital Age

Thursday, December 3, 2015

This paper approaches climate change as a long-standing political struggle from below, rather than a new crisis to be solved by scientific expertise, corporate accountability, or governmental efficiency from above. I examine how the urban poor in South Africa manage air pollution that is at once chemical, spiritual, and technological. I focus on a tension between breathing and being unable to breathe, a characteristic state in historically segregated townships and shack settlements. A key practice mediating these states is what residents refer to as “coughing out” (ukubhodla in isiZulu). Ukubhodla is when you clear your lungs to breathe – whether to sing, pray, or speak to ancestors – in effervescent collective space. The local and global networks produced, in spite of their fleeting and ephemeral qualities, give substance to public solidarity between residents. Broadly, I argue that breathing, the most taken-for-granted of human activities, is a highly differentiated practice. As the first and the last gesture of politics, breathing embodies innovative challenges by the urban poor to climate change consensus.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Laura Kunreuther
Associate Professor of Anthropology
"Transparency, Interpretation, and the Sounds of Testimony"

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

This paper focuses on the labor of interpreters hired by the UN and UN High Commission of Human Rights (OCHR) after the Maoist war in Nepal, and the politics of voice inherent in their work. Such interpreters are key figures of global citizenship and embody the international ideals espoused by the UN, OCHR, and other similar human rights and humanitarian organizations.  They are hired to reproduce the speech of others guided by an ideology of transparency and machine-like fidelity. The victims of human rights abuses with whom they are paired are often described as voiceless subjects, and the interpreter's task is to access testimonies and eye-witness accounts for use as evidence in human rights cases and policy, a process sometimes described as "giving victims a voice."   

Sound is central to the experience that results, as interpreters describe the labor of intense listening that is the basis of the testimonies they are hired to produce. In this talk, I consider how UN human rights interpreters help constitute a global citizenship in which the sounds and voices that convey extreme experience becomes portable in the form of texts to a wider public. Their work, based on what they "selflessly" hear and transmit rather than on what they themselves have seen, heard, or felt, is part of a broader production of the myth of transparency.
 Please join us for a reception prior to the event beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Olin Atrium

Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Sound Cluster meeting

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Monthly meeting of faculty interested in the practice or critical analysis of sound, sound technologies, soundscapes, listening.

Time: 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Arendt Center E-mail to Friend

When Shelter Becomes Exposure: Everyday chemical encounters and the substantiation of the surreal in late industrialism

Thursday, November 5, 2015

The formaldehyde-based resins of pressed woods are an overlooked, yet foundational, agent in the homemaking and technological dreamworlds of mid-20th century America and continue to undergird much of the comfort, security, and affordability of the modern home. I ethnographically track formaldehyde from the shale pores from which its precursor is siphoned, a mile below the earth’s surface, to abandoned homes decomposing into the rural landscape—its formaldehyde stores almost entirely sublimated into the atmosphere. This paper asks, what does the good life look like in an engineered world that subsidizes our standard of living while ever-so-slowly smothering us.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Reproductive Rights and Responsibilities:
The production of ethical subjects in Mexico City's new public abortion program

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Abortion clinics in Mexico City’s new public abortion program do more than provide medical care: they function as venues for the production of ethical subjects of the modern Mexican state. My dissertation examines how a central yet unexposed dimension of public abortion care involves “responsibilization”, a governing technique deployed increasingly in advanced neoliberal democracies (Rose 2000).  Within the public program, begun in 2007, abortion is treated as the result of careless sexual decision-making; clinicians regularly enjoin patients to be more responsible. Invocations of individual responsibility detach abortion from social and structural context such that it emerges as a moral problem of individuals needing ethical reconstitution. Responsibilization is indicative of broader transformations in “reproductive governance” unfolding throughout Latin America alongside the incorporation of neoliberal economic policies and logics that emphasize self-sufficiency (Morgan and Roberts 2012). These changes have important consequences for citizenship. Based on eighteen months of ethnographic research in Mexico City abortion clinics, including interviews with patients and staff, I argue that the program produces sexually (ir)responsible subjects instead of the empowered citizens that feminists and policy-makers had imagined with abortion reform. This moralizing context prevents the internalization of abortion rights, an element I conceptualize as central to reproductive citizenship.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

The Architecture of Exile: Palestinian Refugee Camps as World Heritage Site

Monday, September 28, 2015

Monday, September 28th, 2015 at 6pm in Olin Room 102In recent years, architectural conservation has become a field of knowledge and a practice able to reframe our understanding of aesthetics, cultural heritage, and history. For some, architectural conservation was understood mainly as a discipline that froze time, space, and culture, reducing buildings to lifeless objects for contemplation. Today, however, it has evolved into an operative field that includes thinking about material and immaterial cultures, the preservation of social and identity structures, and the negotiation of contested spaces where national identities are constructed and demolished.Architectural preservationists started to identify and protect structures built centuries ago. Later on, we discovered that modernism, which claimed to be ahistorical, needed to be preserved as part of an historical narration of the city. Now we are at a moment when rough industrial zones can be thought of as places of national heritage, and refugee camps become sites of heated discussions about what should and should not be remembered, or perhaps more importantly, what should and should not  be forgotten.

If we look at refugee camps through the lens of architectural preservation, how might our understanding of camps change?Refugee camps are considered temporary spaces to be quickly dismantled. But how are we to understand the Palestinian refugee camps that are now almost 70 years old? Can we consider them cultural sites to be preserved?For many, being asked to look at refugee camps from this perspective may be a disturbing proposition. But this is the reality that is in front of our eyes, and therefore one that we cannot negate. One of the urgent questions becomes: do Palestinian refugee camps have history? And how might this history be mobilized for the right of return, instead of being perceived as a threat? And at the same time how does the concept of architectural heritage change when applied to refugee camps?
For the workshop we would like to examine these questions and explore the political implications of challenging existing categories of nation, camp, and heritage. In collaboration with the Riwaq Center for Architectural Conservation and in the framework of the Riwaq Biennial, we have just started work on the documentation that will support the inscription of a group of buildings in refugee camps as World Heritage Sites under the protection of UNESCO.Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti are both architects and artists. Together they direct Campus in Camps, an experimental educational program based in Dheisheh refugee camp in Palestine. They are also co-founders, along with Eyal Weizman, of the Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency  in Bethlehem.

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

Friday, September 4, 2015

Interested in applying for a Fulbright Scholarship, a Watson fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of the  two information sessions!

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Olin 102 E-mail to Friend

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Interested in applying for a Fulbright Grant, a Watson Fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of these two sessions!

Time: 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend

Rendering Responsibility:
State Imaginaries and the Movements against the Vietnam and Iraq Wars

Monday, May 4, 2015

The movement against the Vietnam War began modestly, but grew in both size and intensity as the years and the war dragged on. The movement against the Iraq War, in contrast, came together quickly and massively in the space of months and then largely receded from public view. Although the presence (and then absence) of the draft is often invoked as an explanation for the different trajectories of these movements, military recruitment practices are not the most important thing to have changed since the Vietnam era. Drawing on original archival work, this talk will trace how basic understandings of the nature of the state and citizenship (what I call “state imaginaries”) have also changed, and argue that this had profound consequences for antiwar activism in each moment by shaping how and where activists located responsibility for war.

Time: 1:30 pm
Location: RKC 102B E-mail to Friend

Antarctic Edge: 70degrees South

Monday, April 20, 2015

Antarctic Edge: 70° South is a thrilling journey to the bottom of the Earth alongside a team of dedicated scientists. In the wake of devastating climate events like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina, oceanographer Oscar Schofield teams up with a group of world-class researchers in a race to understand climate change in the fastest winter-warming place on earth: the West Antarctic Peninsula. For more than 20 years, these scientists have dedicated their lives to studying the Peninsula's rapid change as part of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research Project.

Filmed in the world's most perilous environment, Antarctic Edge brings to us the stunning landscapes and seascapes of Earth's southern polar region, revealing the harsh conditions and substantial challenges that scientists must endure for months at a time. While navigating through 60-foot waves and dangerous icebergs, the film follows them as they voyage south to the rugged, inhospitable Charcot Island, where they plan to study the fragile and rapidly declining Adelie Penguin. For Schofield and his crew, these birds are the greatest indicator of climate change and a harbinger of what is to come.

Antarctic Edge: 70° South was made in a collaboration between the Rutgers University Film Bureau and the Rutgers Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. A unique inter-disciplinary educational project bridging art, science and storytelling, Antarctic Edge was funded in part by the National Science Foundation.

Followed by a short reception 630-7 and a lecture at 7 PM: Bridging Humanities, Art and Science Through Digital Filmmaking

Time: 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Omar Tesdell: Nature Reserves, Territory, and the Question of Palestinian Cultivation

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Beginning mid-nineteenth century, first French and Ottoman officials, and later British officials set aside significant tracts of land for environmental conservation in the Arab world. The convention was continued under subsequent Jordanian administration of the West Bank. In fact, nature areas remain one of the largest classifications of land in the Palestinian West Bank today, covering more than 30 official reserves, or about 5 percent of the land area. This little-known legacy reveals the enduring and contested status of protected conservation areas in Historic Palestine. Recent scholarship on the topic has elucidated the establishment of forest and nature reserves in Palestine and connections with other British colonial sites. However, little is known about the relationship between conservation programs and affected Palestinians. This paper explores the contested status of protected areas through the articulation of official conservation programs and Palestinian cultivation practice in the West Bank.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin 304 E-mail to Friend

Open Sounds, Hidden Spaces: Listening, Wandering, and Spatial Formation in Sufi Iran

Thursday, April 9, 2015

As the Iranian authorities continue to frown upon public gatherings, Sufi Orders have sought alternative methods of convening while still complying with city regulations. One informal Sufi group in the city of Isfahan does so by meeting in private homes and rotating locations each week. Rather than circulate the specific address of a meeting place, however, the mystics instead instruct the others to meet at a nearby intersection, and then broadcast music from a courtyard or house to alert the members to the exact location. This in turn allows them to locate the site by listening for and ultimately “following” the sounds. It is in this way that the Sufis utilize the practice of intentional listening (sama) and mystical ideals of wandering to navigate the politics of Iranian urban space. This talk will hence examine the utilization of mystical epistemologies to lead to the emergence of an alternative Islamic space in post-revolutionary Iran.
 

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 101 E-mail to Friend

The Rickshaw and the Policeman: Zulu Men, Work and Clothing in Colonial Natal

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

This paper will explore the two careers of rickshaw puller and policeman through the lens of clothing since the rickshaw pullers were often spectacularly dressed in “costumes” that echoed “Zulu” aesthetics while the policeman was stripped of such excess and given a suit and various other articles of clothing made of worsted wool. As photographic subjects, the rickshaw and the policeman seem to be polar opposites and yet many men seem to have cycled through both careers. The paper will also explore how the very notion of a “career” was established specifically for Zulu men and how forms of work as diverse as child caring and laundering were all tied together by assumptions that were made about the expendability of Zulu bodies. Needless to say, even the term “Zulu” is used advisedly since there was as much wishful thinking and fantasy on the part of photographers as there was a tangible reality that can be termed “Zuluness”.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: RKC 115 E-mail to Friend

Sound and Affect Lecture Series

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Avery Art Center, Center for Film, Electronic Arts and Music E-mail to Friend

Bard Builds First Meeting!

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

We are set for another great semester of internships, guest lectures and workshops.  We will hold our first bi-weekly group meeting this Wednesday at 7pm on the second floor of Olin–specific room TBA.  We will give a brief introduction to the three divisions of BardBuilds, as well as the expectations we have for members. Then figure out what internship or workshops you will be interested in!

Time: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 201 E-mail to Friend

"Anthropology, Photography and the Field of Memory: Images from South Sudan"

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Patti Langton, a British anthropologist and documentary film-maker, lived in Sudan 1979-1980 with the Larim (or Boya) people, cattle pastoralists whose homeland lies near South Sudan’s borders with Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia.

Her remarkable photographic and sound archive has recently been acquired by the Pitt-Rivers Museum in Oxford, where she is a Research Associate. The photographs document the lives of a remote people on the eve of war, the prolonged period of national conflict that has since engulfed the Larim and other communities in South Sudan.

Patti Langton will discuss the fate of these images form creation to curation, from the moment of taking the photograph to its afterlife in a museum.

Time: 6:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

As Long as There Is Breath, a Film by Stephanie Spray

Thursday, February 5, 2015

A film shot in Nepal, produced through Harvard Sensory Ethnography Lab.

Time: 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Avery Art Center, Center for Film, Electronic Arts and Music E-mail to Friend Discussion

Sound Cluster meeting

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Monthly meeting of faculty interested in the practice or critical analysis of sound, sound technologies, soundscapes, listening.

Time: 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Arendt Center E-mail to Friend Workshop

The Architecture of Exile: Palestinian Refugee Camps as World Heritage Site

Monday, September 28, 2015

Monday, September 28th, 2015 at 6pm in Olin Room 102In recent years, architectural conservation has become a field of knowledge and a practice able to reframe our understanding of aesthetics, cultural heritage, and history. For some, architectural conservation was understood mainly as a discipline that froze time, space, and culture, reducing buildings to lifeless objects for contemplation. Today, however, it has evolved into an operative field that includes thinking about material and immaterial cultures, the preservation of social and identity structures, and the negotiation of contested spaces where national identities are constructed and demolished.Architectural preservationists started to identify and protect structures built centuries ago. Later on, we discovered that modernism, which claimed to be ahistorical, needed to be preserved as part of an historical narration of the city. Now we are at a moment when rough industrial zones can be thought of as places of national heritage, and refugee camps become sites of heated discussions about what should and should not be remembered, or perhaps more importantly, what should and should not  be forgotten.

If we look at refugee camps through the lens of architectural preservation, how might our understanding of camps change?Refugee camps are considered temporary spaces to be quickly dismantled. But how are we to understand the Palestinian refugee camps that are now almost 70 years old? Can we consider them cultural sites to be preserved?For many, being asked to look at refugee camps from this perspective may be a disturbing proposition. But this is the reality that is in front of our eyes, and therefore one that we cannot negate. One of the urgent questions becomes: do Palestinian refugee camps have history? And how might this history be mobilized for the right of return, instead of being perceived as a threat? And at the same time how does the concept of architectural heritage change when applied to refugee camps?
For the workshop we would like to examine these questions and explore the political implications of challenging existing categories of nation, camp, and heritage. In collaboration with the Riwaq Center for Architectural Conservation and in the framework of the Riwaq Biennial, we have just started work on the documentation that will support the inscription of a group of buildings in refugee camps as World Heritage Sites under the protection of UNESCO.Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti are both architects and artists. Together they direct Campus in Camps, an experimental educational program based in Dheisheh refugee camp in Palestine. They are also co-founders, along with Eyal Weizman, of the Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency  in Bethlehem.

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend Academic Deadline

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

Friday, September 4, 2015

Interested in applying for a Fulbright Scholarship, a Watson fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of the  two information sessions!

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Olin 102 E-mail to Friend

Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Interested in applying for a Fulbright Grant, a Watson Fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of these two sessions!

Time: 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend Film

Antarctic Edge: 70degrees South

Monday, April 20, 2015

Antarctic Edge: 70° South is a thrilling journey to the bottom of the Earth alongside a team of dedicated scientists. In the wake of devastating climate events like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina, oceanographer Oscar Schofield teams up with a group of world-class researchers in a race to understand climate change in the fastest winter-warming place on earth: the West Antarctic Peninsula. For more than 20 years, these scientists have dedicated their lives to studying the Peninsula's rapid change as part of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research Project.

Filmed in the world's most perilous environment, Antarctic Edge brings to us the stunning landscapes and seascapes of Earth's southern polar region, revealing the harsh conditions and substantial challenges that scientists must endure for months at a time. While navigating through 60-foot waves and dangerous icebergs, the film follows them as they voyage south to the rugged, inhospitable Charcot Island, where they plan to study the fragile and rapidly declining Adelie Penguin. For Schofield and his crew, these birds are the greatest indicator of climate change and a harbinger of what is to come.

Antarctic Edge: 70° South was made in a collaboration between the Rutgers University Film Bureau and the Rutgers Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. A unique inter-disciplinary educational project bridging art, science and storytelling, Antarctic Edge was funded in part by the National Science Foundation.

Followed by a short reception 630-7 and a lecture at 7 PM: Bridging Humanities, Art and Science Through Digital Filmmaking

Time: 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

As Long as There Is Breath, a Film by Stephanie Spray

Thursday, February 5, 2015

A film shot in Nepal, produced through Harvard Sensory Ethnography Lab.

Time: 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Avery Art Center, Center for Film, Electronic Arts and Music E-mail to Friend Community Engagement

Bard Builds First Meeting!

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

We are set for another great semester of internships, guest lectures and workshops.  We will hold our first bi-weekly group meeting this Wednesday at 7pm on the second floor of Olin–specific room TBA.  We will give a brief introduction to the three divisions of BardBuilds, as well as the expectations we have for members. Then figure out what internship or workshops you will be interested in!

Time: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 201 E-mail to Friend A Screening

Nuclear Savage

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema E-mail to Friend

Instruments of Lament: Communication without Words in the New Orleans Jazz Funeral

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

In New Orleans, the instruments of the brass band are sound technologies utilized to communicate particular messages to a community of listeners. In the local tradition of the jazz funeral, musicians determine the emotional register of the procession: mournful hymns regulate the slow march to the gravesite and upbeat popular songs signal the transition to celebratory dancing after burial. The musicians not only organize the memorial by changing tempo and repertoire, they communicate to the living and the dead through the material sound of their instruments. Black New Orleanians occupying public spaces where lynchings, race riots, segregation, and gentrification have taken place “give voice” to these submerged histories by marching and dancing to the beat of the brass band. And the most recent generation of musicians has drawn upon hip-hop, integrating the direct language of rap into a polyphony of voices that includes horns, drums, and group singing. In this case study of the brass bands of New Orleans, a holistic approach to sonic materiality integrates the spoken, the sung, and instrumental sound in a densely layered soundscape that creates meaning and value for racialized subjects of power. *Childcare available*
Contact Laura Kunreuther for more information
kunreuth@bard.edu

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Neo Muyanga: A Study in Sound and Image

Monday, November 10, 2014

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Bard Hall, Bard College Campus E-mail to Friend

Film - Awake, My Soul: The Story of the Sacred Harp

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Come learn about one of the oldest forms of American music, shapenote singing, which is still practiced in many parts of the United States and abroad.  This documentary features interviews with longtime singers in this tradition, as well as many minutes of sound and footage of the songs themselves.

The screening will be followed by a brief Q & A period.

Sponsored by Bard Ethnomusicology

Time: 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Silence, Taboo, and Everyday Practices of Revolution: What Sovereignty Feels Like

Monday, October 27, 2014

Much has been written about the effects of extreme violence – and particularly state violence – on individuals and communities throughout the world. Attention has tended to focus on the forms of marginalization and exclusion generated by and through violence, on the “bare life” and “exceptionality” that has been theorized by a range of European political philosophers. My interest in this presentation is to think sovereignty, in both its conventional registers, outside the state by highlighting instead its everyday practice. Drawing from narratives generated through two collaborative projects geared toward visually archiving state violence in Jamaica – the Coral Gardens “Incident” in Western Jamaica in 1963, and the May 2010 state of emergency in West Kingston – I will show that thinking about what sovereignty feels like means being committed and attuned to the non-monumental, unspectacular world of the everyday and the dynamic structuring categories through which it is lived. On one hand, these narratives show us something about the conditions of violence that both define the parameters of legitimate citizenship and lay the foundation for the periodic eruptions of exceptional violence. On the other hand, they provide a sense of the extent to which people are able to imagine, or imagine themselves enacting, alternative political futures. It is this latter dimension that gives us a sense of the affective dimensions of sovereignty. Exploring what sovereignty feels like, therefore, illuminates not only the ways alternative projects circulate in and through social communities even if the material movements that produce them “fail,” but also the entanglements across time and space that both produce and attempt to destroy them. *Childcare available*

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Whitehead’s Process, Music’s Reality:
Sound and Affect after the Ontological Turn

Thursday, October 9, 2014

In this talk I query the recent turn to ontology in anthropology and in the humanities more broadly. I investigate how both sound and affect figure in this ontological turn and how conceptions of both have been grounded in the thought of Gilles Deleuze. While Deleuze and others have drawn upon Alfred North Whitehead to conceptualize affect and its political promise, I argue that Whitehead has been misread and that he offers a more compositional way of thinking sound and affect through his philosophy. While Deleuze and his interlocutors find affect politically valuable precisely to the degree to which it exceeds subjectivity and engenders processes of “deterritorialization,” I argue that Whitehead offers a way to think of emotion as that which holds us together in fragile yet necessary bonds, with musical experience serving as a primary example of such collectivity. 

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

"Celebrity Rapture, Selfie Love, Parody after Identity"

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

There is a curiously intimate relationship between parody and identity in the era of digital circulation. Parody has shaped popular music in ways that reflect neoliberal sensibilities and how lives are lived through social media. For youth around the world, mobile popular culture and selfie-portraiture provide structures to imagine themselves as agents of change, as economically successful, as cosmopolitan. Digital music makes youth loud, literally and metaphorically, while also creating intimate channels of connection among social media users. Popular musical parodies are not simply humorous but take on authority gleaned from reference to more sincere forms of speaking and acting. In contemporary contexts, parody works by blurring the line between satire and sincerity and obscuring artistic intent. This paper examines an irreverent international Ghanaian hip-hop duo, the FOKN Bois who have built their fame through the potential and power of musical parody. They make outrageous songs that incite both fans and critics to respond with outrage, pleasure, or both. Their track “Thank God We’re Not a Nigerians” mocks the long-standing intimate ambivalence between Ghanaian and Nigerian nationhoods. While it explicitly pokes fun at Nigerian styles and moralities, it implicitly mocks how Ghanaians scrutinize and moralize about Nigerians. For young Ghanaian artists and audiences, shared language-use in multimodal digital popular music indexes membership in a pan-West African mobile community that refuses simple identities and mocks nationalism by blurring and moving between familiar register, speech practices, and ideas of moral value.


Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Peter Rosenblum
 Professor of International Law and Human Rights

 

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

As “corporate social responsibility” enters the mainstream, itsinitials "CSR" have become a dirty word for a broad segment of the
engaged public.  The voluntariness, vagueness, and uncertainty of
enforcement  – not to mention blatant propaganda by companies –
overwhelm any positive value, they argue.  At the other end of the
spectrum, CSR enthusiasts insist that it is leading to a new paradigm,
even challenging traditional forms of corporate governance. Oft
overlooked in the debate over CSR is the way in which public campaigns
have driven change and, even more importantly, shaped the mechanisms
that emerge. CSR continues to be as much the story of savvy activists
leveraging global networks as it is the monitoring mechanisms and
codes of conduct -- maybe more so.  Peter Rosenblum will explore the
current debate, drawing on his recently completed research on Indian
Tea plantations and a soon-to-published chapter addressing advocates
and critics of CSR.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Sociology Open House

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Come and meet current and returning faculty to learn about courses in the Sociology Program this fall.

All are welcome—whether you are considering majoring or interested in a particular class.

Refreshments will be served.

Time: 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Location: Kline, President's Room
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Teju Cole in Conversation with John Ryle

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Multipurpose Room E-mail to Friend

Premodern Technopolitics? Empire and Infrastructure in the Inka Cloud Forest

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Infrastructure has recently emerged as core site for innovative research in anthropology, and within the social sciences in general. Much of this work has sought to analyze infrastructures from a technopolitical perspective, whereby there is no a priori distinction to be made between technological artifacts and political projects, with both seen as being inscribed in the other from the very beginning. This talk considers the interpretive possibilities that arise when a technopolitical account is given of pre-modern infrastructure, drawing on the archaeological case of Inka highways in the pre-colonial Andes. It also considers the pitfalls in seeking to translate such analytical frames across modern and non-modern worlds, arguing that in the end, a technopolitical approach must always rely on modernist categories to some degree, even as it seeks to critique them.

Darryl Wilkinson is an archaeological anthropologist whose research addresses the themes of materiality, power and indigenous ontologies in the ancient Andes. He received his PhD from Columbia in 2013, and is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Cultural Analysis and a member of the 'Objects and Environments' research seminar at Rutgers University. His research has been published in the journals World Archaeology and the Cambridge Archaeological Journal.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Olin, Room 202 E-mail to Friend

A Rightful Share: Beyond Gift and Market in the Politics of Distribution

Thursday, April 10, 2014

This paper develops an argument that new kinds of welfare states in the global South are opening up possibilities for new sorts of politics.  Against an analysis of the limitations of traditional ideas of nationalization in Africa, it seeks to show that new forms of social assistance are allowing the question of national ownership of wealth to be reimagined in new ways -- ways that may allow the idea of a ”rightful share” to take on a quite different significance than it does in traditional discussions of nationalization of natural resources. Taking recent campaigns for a “Basic Income Grant” (BIG) in South Africa and Namibia as a window onto these new political possibilities, it argues that a new politics of distribution is emerging, in which citizenship-based claims to a share of national wealth are beginning to be recognizable as an alternative to both the paradigm of the market (where goods are received in exchange for labor) and that of “the gift” (where social transfers to those excluded from wage labor have been conceived as aid, charity, or assistance).  Beyond the binary of market and gift, the idea of “a rightful share”, it is suggested, opens possibilities for radical political claims that could go far beyond the limited, technocratic aim of ameliorating poverty that dominates existing cash transfer programs.

James Ferguson is the Susan S. and William H. Hindle Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. His research has focused on southern Africa (especially Lesotho, Zambia, South Africa, and Namibia), and has engaged a broad range of theoretical and ethnographic issues.  His works include The Anti-Politics Machine: 'Development,' Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho; Expectations of Modernity: Myths and Meanings of Urban Life on the Zambian Copperbelt; and Global Shadows: Africa in the Neoliberal World Order.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Kuru Updated

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The unraveling of the epidemic of kuru, a neurodegenerative disease, in a remote area of New Guinea, led to two Nobel Prizes in science and a classic ethnography, Kuru Sorcery, by anthropologist Shirley Lindenbaum, who uncovered the role of endocannibalism in this disease's transmission. The revised and updated second edition of Kuru Sorcery provides an opportunity for a conversation about the place of anthropology in an interdisciplinary research project. Rayna Rapp will consider how kuru helped to define the emergence of medical anthropology in the context of multi-disciplinary research. Shirley Lindenbaum will reflect on how the kuru story has been elaborated in popular literature.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

How Solar Became “Alternative”:
Slavery and the Making of Modern Energy

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Experts who describe solar energy as an “alternative” – that contributes only a small fraction to our oil-driven economy – are measuring the wrong thing. Every day, the sun gives us thousands of times the wattage we consume in oil, gas, coal, and nuclear power. Bizarrely, the entire conventional calculus of energy omits the overwhelming bulk of it, the elephant in a small room.  This paper examines an instance of such forgetting: the transition from solar energy to something like oil in the Orinoco Basin of colonial South America. In the 1740s, the Jesuit missionary and geographer, Josef Gumilla marveled in the God-given fertility of the tropics. Solar rays and Spanish settlers, he hoped, would turn the Orinoco into a breadbasket for cacao. Forty years later, the governor of Trinidad, Josef María Chacón proposed a second plan for colonization. On this island of the Orinoco delta, he identified tropical fertility with disease and overly dense vegetation. Instead of solar rays, Chacón’s promotion of sugar required enslaved Africans, and lots of them. The governor calculated employment rates per land area, death rates, and replacement rates through imports. In so doing, he helped create the modern, narrow concept of energy: a transportable, storable commodity unrelated to either the landscape or to God. One could almost squeeze exploited labor into barrels and sell it by the gallon. When geologists discovered oil – on Trinidad, in fact, in 1859 – the energy experts were ready for it. In cultural terms, slaves served as the bridge fuel from solar energy to petroleum. Remembering this history adds a span to the bridge back in the other direction.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Music, Choice, and Consequence:

Thursday, February 20, 2014

A contemplation and contemporary contextualization of processes and impact of selection in music as revealed in the moral dilemma of contemporary African-American commercial music.

ANTHONY M. KELLEY BIOGRAPHYAnthony Kelley joined the Duke University music faculty in 2000 after serving as Composer-in-Residence with the Richmond Symphony for three years under a grant from Meet the Composer. His recent work (like his soundtracks for the H. Lee Waters/Tom Whiteside film "Conjuring Bearden" [2006] Dante James's film, "The Doll" [2007], Josh Gibson's "Kudzu Vine" [2011]) explores music as linked with other media, arts, and sociological phenomena. 
In 2011, Kelley was the winner of Duke's Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award. 
He has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies in Duke's Department of Music since his appointment to the post in Fall, 2012.

Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Olin Hall E-mail to Friend

Music, Sound and Affect in Japan's Antinuclear Movement

Monday, February 17, 2014

This talk considers the recent mix of "sound demos,” art installations and antinuclear music festivals in contexts of political protest in Japan since the tsunami and subsequent nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi on March 11, 2011. I focus on a performance festival called Project Fukushima! organized by experimental musician Ôtomo Yoshihide, poet Wago Ryoichi and punk rock legend Endô Michirô to provoke public discourse about nuclear power and the future of the partly-evacuated city (the name of his hometown, Ôtomo said, should not become a generalized reference to nuclear accident -- “another Chernobyl”). Only a few months after the meltdown in 2011 and again in August 2012, this group of underground performers brought audiences in the thousands back to Fukushima. Bands performed on stages, in the streets, and on local trains; the audience sat on a gigantic furoshiki cloth tapestry conceived to protect them from the irradiated ground. In addition to his role as primary organizer and performer in Project Fukushima! Ôtomo has written powerfully on the role of arts and culture in the response to the Fukushima Disaster, and gives regular public talks about cultural activism, as well as authoring widely circulated blogposts and tweets about the antinuclear movement. Through my ethnographic research in Tokyo, Osaka, and Fukushima in 2012 and 2013, I contextualize Project Fukushima! as part of an ongoing series of public actions of music and noise making and “reclaim-the-streets” performance tactics that galvanized public response to the nuclear restart and the future of energy policy in Japan.
David Novak is an Associate Professor of Music and Ethnomusicology at UC Santa Barbara.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend Concert

Neo Muyanga: A Study in Sound and Image

Monday, November 10, 2014

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Bard Hall, Bard College Campus E-mail to Friend Film

Film - Awake, My Soul: The Story of the Sacred Harp

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Come learn about one of the oldest forms of American music, shapenote singing, which is still practiced in many parts of the United States and abroad.  This documentary features interviews with longtime singers in this tradition, as well as many minutes of sound and footage of the songs themselves.

The screening will be followed by a brief Q & A period.

Sponsored by Bard Ethnomusicology

Time: 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Information Session/Open House

Sociology Open House

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Come and meet current and returning faculty to learn about courses in the Sociology Program this fall.

All are welcome—whether you are considering majoring or interested in a particular class.

Refreshments will be served.

Time: 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Location: Kline, President's Room
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Conversation

Teju Cole in Conversation with John Ryle

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Multipurpose Room E-mail to Friend Lecture

A Rightful Share: Beyond Gift and Market in the Politics of Distribution

Thursday, April 10, 2014

This paper develops an argument that new kinds of welfare states in the global South are opening up possibilities for new sorts of politics.  Against an analysis of the limitations of traditional ideas of nationalization in Africa, it seeks to show that new forms of social assistance are allowing the question of national ownership of wealth to be reimagined in new ways -- ways that may allow the idea of a ”rightful share” to take on a quite different significance than it does in traditional discussions of nationalization of natural resources. Taking recent campaigns for a “Basic Income Grant” (BIG) in South Africa and Namibia as a window onto these new political possibilities, it argues that a new politics of distribution is emerging, in which citizenship-based claims to a share of national wealth are beginning to be recognizable as an alternative to both the paradigm of the market (where goods are received in exchange for labor) and that of “the gift” (where social transfers to those excluded from wage labor have been conceived as aid, charity, or assistance).  Beyond the binary of market and gift, the idea of “a rightful share”, it is suggested, opens possibilities for radical political claims that could go far beyond the limited, technocratic aim of ameliorating poverty that dominates existing cash transfer programs.

James Ferguson is the Susan S. and William H. Hindle Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. His research has focused on southern Africa (especially Lesotho, Zambia, South Africa, and Namibia), and has engaged a broad range of theoretical and ethnographic issues.  His works include The Anti-Politics Machine: 'Development,' Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho; Expectations of Modernity: Myths and Meanings of Urban Life on the Zambian Copperbelt; and Global Shadows: Africa in the Neoliberal World Order.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Kuru Updated

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The unraveling of the epidemic of kuru, a neurodegenerative disease, in a remote area of New Guinea, led to two Nobel Prizes in science and a classic ethnography, Kuru Sorcery, by anthropologist Shirley Lindenbaum, who uncovered the role of endocannibalism in this disease's transmission. The revised and updated second edition of Kuru Sorcery provides an opportunity for a conversation about the place of anthropology in an interdisciplinary research project. Rayna Rapp will consider how kuru helped to define the emergence of medical anthropology in the context of multi-disciplinary research. Shirley Lindenbaum will reflect on how the kuru story has been elaborated in popular literature.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

How Solar Became “Alternative”:
Slavery and the Making of Modern Energy

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Experts who describe solar energy as an “alternative” – that contributes only a small fraction to our oil-driven economy – are measuring the wrong thing. Every day, the sun gives us thousands of times the wattage we consume in oil, gas, coal, and nuclear power. Bizarrely, the entire conventional calculus of energy omits the overwhelming bulk of it, the elephant in a small room.  This paper examines an instance of such forgetting: the transition from solar energy to something like oil in the Orinoco Basin of colonial South America. In the 1740s, the Jesuit missionary and geographer, Josef Gumilla marveled in the God-given fertility of the tropics. Solar rays and Spanish settlers, he hoped, would turn the Orinoco into a breadbasket for cacao. Forty years later, the governor of Trinidad, Josef María Chacón proposed a second plan for colonization. On this island of the Orinoco delta, he identified tropical fertility with disease and overly dense vegetation. Instead of solar rays, Chacón’s promotion of sugar required enslaved Africans, and lots of them. The governor calculated employment rates per land area, death rates, and replacement rates through imports. In so doing, he helped create the modern, narrow concept of energy: a transportable, storable commodity unrelated to either the landscape or to God. One could almost squeeze exploited labor into barrels and sell it by the gallon. When geologists discovered oil – on Trinidad, in fact, in 1859 – the energy experts were ready for it. In cultural terms, slaves served as the bridge fuel from solar energy to petroleum. Remembering this history adds a span to the bridge back in the other direction.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

Music, Choice, and Consequence:

Thursday, February 20, 2014

A contemplation and contemporary contextualization of processes and impact of selection in music as revealed in the moral dilemma of contemporary African-American commercial music.

ANTHONY M. KELLEY BIOGRAPHYAnthony Kelley joined the Duke University music faculty in 2000 after serving as Composer-in-Residence with the Richmond Symphony for three years under a grant from Meet the Composer. His recent work (like his soundtracks for the H. Lee Waters/Tom Whiteside film "Conjuring Bearden" [2006] Dante James's film, "The Doll" [2007], Josh Gibson's "Kudzu Vine" [2011]) explores music as linked with other media, arts, and sociological phenomena. 
In 2011, Kelley was the winner of Duke's Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award. 
He has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies in Duke's Department of Music since his appointment to the post in Fall, 2012.

Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Olin Hall E-mail to Friend

Music, Sound and Affect in Japan's Antinuclear Movement

Monday, February 17, 2014

This talk considers the recent mix of "sound demos,” art installations and antinuclear music festivals in contexts of political protest in Japan since the tsunami and subsequent nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi on March 11, 2011. I focus on a performance festival called Project Fukushima! organized by experimental musician Ôtomo Yoshihide, poet Wago Ryoichi and punk rock legend Endô Michirô to provoke public discourse about nuclear power and the future of the partly-evacuated city (the name of his hometown, Ôtomo said, should not become a generalized reference to nuclear accident -- “another Chernobyl”). Only a few months after the meltdown in 2011 and again in August 2012, this group of underground performers brought audiences in the thousands back to Fukushima. Bands performed on stages, in the streets, and on local trains; the audience sat on a gigantic furoshiki cloth tapestry conceived to protect them from the irradiated ground. In addition to his role as primary organizer and performer in Project Fukushima! Ôtomo has written powerfully on the role of arts and culture in the response to the Fukushima Disaster, and gives regular public talks about cultural activism, as well as authoring widely circulated blogposts and tweets about the antinuclear movement. Through my ethnographic research in Tokyo, Osaka, and Fukushima in 2012 and 2013, I contextualize Project Fukushima! as part of an ongoing series of public actions of music and noise making and “reclaim-the-streets” performance tactics that galvanized public response to the nuclear restart and the future of energy policy in Japan.
David Novak is an Associate Professor of Music and Ethnomusicology at UC Santa Barbara.

Time: 4:45 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend A talk by Peter Klein, Candidate for the Position in Sociology/EUS

Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam and the Struggle for Political Voice

Friday, December 13, 2013

The Belo Monte hydroelectric facility, located in the Brazilian Amazon, will be the world’s third largest dam when completed in 2019. This energy project is touted as a sustainable development initiative, but its construction is bringing rapid social and environmental changes to the urban centers closest to the construction site, disproportionately affecting marginalized communities through displacement, rising prices, and inadequate government services. In this context, I examine the factors that enable and constrain dam-affected people as they make demands for their rights, highlighting the importance of collective imaginations of the future. I argue that effective translation, or the reframing of these imagined futures into language and demands that can be understood and acted upon by others, is a necessary step in addressing the needs of the most marginalized.

Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Comics in Real Life: The Graphic Journalism of Dan Archer

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Dan Archer creates non-fictional, journalistic comics to offer a new perspective on US foreign and domestic policy and give voice to stories that wouldn’t otherwise be heard. His topics include human trafficking in Nepal, the International Criminal Court, the Honduran Coup, Occupy Oakland, Bhutan refugees and more.
This event is part of the series "What You Need to Know about Journalism Now," with events taking place November 10–13. Events in this series:

Comics in Real Life: The Graphic Journalism of Dan Archer
7 p.m. Sunday, November 10 in the MPR

Privacy and Freedom of Information in the Age of Digital Journalism: A Panel with Azmat Khan, Noorain Khan, and Nabiha Syed
6 p.m. Monday, November 11 in Olin 102

Resignation, Layoffs, and the State of Journalism Now: With Francesca Shanks, Adam Shanks, Tom Casey, Billy Shannon
5 p.m. Tuesday, November 12 in Preston HallBeing Ambitious and Being Yourself: A Talk by
Professor Walter Russell Mead
7 p.m. Wednesday, November 13 in the MPR

Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Multipurpose Room E-mail to Friend

Troubling Heritage: Contemporary Museums and the Terrain of the Civil War in a Southern City

Monday, October 21, 2013

Richmond Virginia, erstwhile capital of the Confederacy, is a city that memorialized in its built landscape the ideology of the “Lost Cause.” This lecture will provide a preliminary sketch for the ways that local history and art museums with national stature have responded and continue to respond to this troubling heritage as they try to create a more salutary urban imagined community. These museums are leaders in a wider movement among US cities of a certain size to explicitly link cultural development to urban renewal. As such they must attract a national audience while not alienating local communities which, for their part, are often polarized along all too familiar racial and ideological lines.


Eric Gable is a professor of anthropology at the University of Mary Washington. He is a managing editor for the journal Museum and Society and the associate editor for book reviews for American Ethnologist.

Time: 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend

Thinking Like A River (opening night)

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Following on Wofford College’s successful Fall 2012 Thinking Like a River Conference, Thinking Like a River moves north—to Bard College. John Lane—poet, naturalist, southern nature writer and river rat—launched the first Thinking Like a River weekend and he will be on campus to lead discussions and canoe outings over the course of the weekend. With him will be poets, writers, activists, naturalists and river lovers discussing rivers in an interdisciplinary manner. The weekend will kick off on Thursday September 26 at 6 in Bard Hall with music, poems and local food!  Bard graduate Chris Rubeo will sing river songs in the tradition of Pete Seeger and Betty and the Baby Boomers and talk about his environmental work. Art from Lisa Sanditz’s art class will grace the walls along with photographs from Tim Davis’s color photography class.  Guests John Lane and Elizabeth Bradfield will read poems and they will be joined by Bard College faculty Celia Bland and Phil Pardi. Come think about rivers and learn more about Bard’s Environmental and Urban Studies Program.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Bard Hall, Bard College Campus
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Shamanism, Vegetalismo, and the Aesthetics of Healing

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

François Demange
In conversation with Abou Farman
(Department of Anthropology)François Demange (MA Anthropology) has been training with indigenous medicine people and practicing their healing methods since 1996 in both the Peruvian Amazon and in North America.  He is considered one of the most experienced Westerners in the practice of the traditional Amazonian medicine called Vegetalismo, which is defined as the plant spirit medicine practice of that region. François is also a follower of the Red Path; he is a pipe carrier, a Sundancer, and has been adopted by the Dakota Nation.  He uses a combination of spiritual and energetic methods to read, diagnose and address the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual imbalance in his patients. He is a Reiki Master and Co-Founder of Sacred Medicine Foundation.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Bard Hall, Bard College Campus E-mail to Friend

Lecture by Tejaswini Ganti

Monday, April 22, 2013

Tejaswini Ganti is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and its Program in Culture & Media at New York University. A visual anthropologist specializing in South Asia, her research interests include Indian cinema, anthropology of media, production cultures, visual culture, cultural policy, nationalism, neoliberalism, capitalism, ideologies of development and theories of globalization. She has been conducting ethnographic research about the social world and filmmaking practices of the Hindi film industry since 1996 and is the author of Producing Bollywood: Inside the Contemporary Hindi Film Industry (Duke University Press 2012) and Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema (Routledge 2004; 2nd edition, 2013).

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

An Evening of Central Asian Culture and Cooking with AUCA-Bard Staff

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Join the AUCA-Bard staff for an evening of Central Asian culture and cooking! Learn to make Eurasian favorites like plov and manti or just enjoy the food and company.

Held in Robbins House kitchens and common room.

Time: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Robbins House
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Thinking the City: Literature, Theory, Visual Arts

Friday, April 12, 2013

This day-long workshop brings together Bard faculty and students to explore a range of questions on teaching and learning about cities in an academic context.

We will ask: How do the reading of texts, the building of cultural monuments, and the creation of artistic works transform our understandings of the city? Is it possible to read the city as a text or view it as a cultural monument? Are there cities better preserved in cultural memory than physical space? How are identities and ideas of cities formed through literature, film, and other media? In what ways can these different strategies of representation transform the urban experience and the city itself?

Students will present their work on cities at a panel, to be followed by a roundtable for faculty on teaching methodologies, theoretical frameworks, and principles of canon formation to consider when discussing cities and urban space in the classroom.

Time: 10:00 am – 3:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

The Eat Pray Loveification of Balinese Tourism

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó ’60 Conservatory Building E-mail to Friend

Latin Dance Presentation and Music by "La Familia"

Friday, April 5, 2013

Enjoy of the dance, food, and Latin music of the Latin week at Bard.

Time: 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Location: Campus Center MPR E-mail to Friend

Latinidad: Latin@ Student Identity at Bard

Thursday, April 4, 2013

A panel discussion with Bard students, staff, and faculty.
Panelist: Katherine Del Santo '13, Rosemary Ferreira '14, Marial Hoz '14, Julieth Nuñez '14, Melanie Mignucci '16, Adolfo Coyotel '16.

Time: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Location: RKC Room 103 E-mail to Friend

Ancient Music, Modern Myth: History, Antiquity, and Modernity in Traditional Persian Music

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó ’60 Conservatory Building E-mail to Friend

"Sex, Religion, and Secular Cunning"

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Mayanthi Fernando
University of California & Wesleyan UniversityHow does the public/private distinction so central to secular-liberal democracy inflect the secular state's regulation of sex and religion? Focusing on contemporary France, this talk analyzes how political and legal practices aimed at securing secularity by rendering both sex and religion private paradoxically compel Muslim women to reveal in public the innermost details of their sexual and religious lives. That dual incitement to hide and to exhibit, and the grim consequences of exhibiting that which must be hidden, constitute "the cunning of secular power." Mayanthi Fernando is Assistant Professor Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is currently a visiting professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Wesleyan University for Spring 2013. Her first book is Asymmetries of the Republic: Islam, Secularism, and the Future of France, forthcoming from Duke University Press.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Birthright Palestine

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

During the lecture Dana Yahalomi, Public Movement Leader, will present key strategies developed by the movement alongside examples of previous actions. In the last six years, Public Movement has explored the regulations, forces, agents, and policies, formations of identity and systems of ritual which govern the dynamics of public life and public space. The Movement was founded in December 2006 by Omer Krieger and Dana Yahalomi, who later assumed sole leadership in 2011.The lecture will conclude and open into discussion with the recent action SALONS: Birthright Palestine? (February - April 2012, New Museum, NYC) which used the phenomenon of Birthright Israel(1) in order to raise questions about nationality and heritage, as well as about the politics of tourism and branding. In a series of performative public discussions, each adopting existing formats of discursive forums, different publics presented and debated upon related questions and issues that would inform, affirm and/or oppose the proposal to initiate a Birthright Palestine program.

Public Movement is a performative research body which investigates and stages political actions in public spaces. It studies and creates public choreographies, forms of social order, overt and covert rituals. Among Public Movement's actions in the past and in the future: manifestations of presence, fictional acts of hatred, new folk dances, synchronized procedures of movement, spectacles, marches, inventing and reenacting moments in the life of individuals, communities, social institutions, peoples, states, and of humanity.

Public Movement has taken responsibility for the following actions: "Accident" (Tel- Aviv, 2006), "The Israel Museum" (Tel- Aviv, 2007), "Also Thus!" (Acco Festival, 2007), "Operation Free Holon" (The Israeli Center for Digital Art, 2007), "Change of Guard” (With Dani Karavan, Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, 2008), "Public Movement House" (Bat Yam Museum, 2008), “Emergency” (Acco Festival, 2008), “The 86th Anniversary of the assassination of President Gabriel Narutowicz by the painter Eligiusz Niewiadomski” (Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, 2008), "Spring in Warsaw" (Nowy Teatr, 2009), "Performing Politics for Germany" (HAU Berlin, 2009), “Positions” (Van AbbeMuseum, 2009), “First of May Riots “(HAU Berlin, 2010), "University Exercise" (Heidelberg, 2010), "SALONS: Birthright Palestine?" (New Museum, New York, 2012), “Rebranding European Muslims” (Berlin Biennial, 2012, Steirischer Herbst, 2012), “Debriefing Session” (Baltic Circle, Helsinki, 2012), "Civil Fast" (Jerusalem, 2012) and "The Reenactment of the Mount Herzl Terrorist Attack" (Upcoming).

The lecture has been supported by Artis www.artiscontemporary.org

1 Birthright Israel is a 10-day free trip for Jews between the ages of 18 to 26 who travel around Israel together on a bus. It was founded in 1999, sponsored by the government of Israel and American Jewish philanthropy. Over 300,000 people have participated in the program since its founding. Birthright Israel was founded in the hope to address the following concerns: detachment of diaspora Jews to the state of Israel, an increase in intermarriages between Jews and non-Jews and a need to sustain the Israeli-American Lobby, which for years served Israel with political advocacy and a great source of funding.

Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Crashing Waves and Seabird Songs: Strategic Exoticism in the Popular Music of the Crimean Tatar

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

This is a talk based upon doctoral research in the Ukraine among the Sunni Muslim indigenous group of Crimea. 

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó ’60 Conservatory Building E-mail to Friend

Semana Latina / Latin Week

Monday, April 1, 2013

Enjoy the reading of poetry in Spanish and English by students at Bard, right after Junot Diaz reading.

Time: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Location: Olin Hall E-mail to Friend

Central Asian Cooking Night

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Join the AUCA-Bard staff for an evening of Central Asian culture and cooking! Learn to make Eurasian favorites like plov and manti or just enjoy the food and company.

Held in Tewksbury Hall kitchens and common roomJoin the AUCA-Bard staff for an evening of Central Asian culture and cooking! Learn to make Eurasian favorites like and or just enjoy the food and company.Held in the Tewksbury Hall Kitchen and common room

Time: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Tewksbury Hall
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Anthropology Lecture Series: Paul Kockelman

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Paul Kockelman is an Associate Professor at Barnard College and Columbia University. He is a linguistic anthropologist who is broadly interested in the relation between meaning, value, and information. He is the author of Language, Culture, and Mind: Natural Constructions and Social Kinds (Cambridge University Press 2009), as well as numerous articles.

His scholarship has focused on a broad set of interrelated topics concerning language, culture and mind. Methodologically, he draws on his empirical research to analyze relations among grammatical categories, discourse patterns, social relations, and cultural values as they unfold in both face-to-face and more mediated forms of interaction. His research has been sustained by extensive linguistic and ethnographic fieldwork, primarily among speakers of Q’eqchi’-Maya living in the cloud forests of highland Guatemala, and now more and more among scientists and engineers working on and with a variety of information technologies.

Sponsored by Anthropology and Mind, Brain & Behavior.

Time: 6:15 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend Lecture

Comics in Real Life: The Graphic Journalism of Dan Archer

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Dan Archer creates non-fictional, journalistic comics to offer a new perspective on US foreign and domestic policy and give voice to stories that wouldn’t otherwise be heard. His topics include human trafficking in Nepal, the International Criminal Court, the Honduran Coup, Occupy Oakland, Bhutan refugees and more.
This event is part of the series "What You Need to Know about Journalism Now," with events taking place November 10–13. Events in this series:

Comics in Real Life: The Graphic Journalism of Dan Archer
7 p.m. Sunday, November 10 in the MPR

Privacy and Freedom of Information in the Age of Digital Journalism: A Panel with Azmat Khan, Noorain Khan, and Nabiha Syed
6 p.m. Monday, November 11 in Olin 102

Resignation, Layoffs, and the State of Journalism Now: With Francesca Shanks, Adam Shanks, Tom Casey, Billy Shannon
5 p.m. Tuesday, November 12 in Preston HallBeing Ambitious and Being Yourself: A Talk by
Professor Walter Russell Mead
7 p.m. Wednesday, November 13 in the MPR

Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Campus Center, Multipurpose Room E-mail to Friend

Lecture by Tejaswini Ganti

Monday, April 22, 2013

Tejaswini Ganti is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and its Program in Culture & Media at New York University. A visual anthropologist specializing in South Asia, her research interests include Indian cinema, anthropology of media, production cultures, visual culture, cultural policy, nationalism, neoliberalism, capitalism, ideologies of development and theories of globalization. She has been conducting ethnographic research about the social world and filmmaking practices of the Hindi film industry since 1996 and is the author of Producing Bollywood: Inside the Contemporary Hindi Film Industry (Duke University Press 2012) and Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema (Routledge 2004; 2nd edition, 2013).

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

The Eat Pray Loveification of Balinese Tourism

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó ’60 Conservatory Building E-mail to Friend

Ancient Music, Modern Myth: History, Antiquity, and Modernity in Traditional Persian Music

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó ’60 Conservatory Building E-mail to Friend

"Sex, Religion, and Secular Cunning"

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Mayanthi Fernando
University of California & Wesleyan UniversityHow does the public/private distinction so central to secular-liberal democracy inflect the secular state's regulation of sex and religion? Focusing on contemporary France, this talk analyzes how political and legal practices aimed at securing secularity by rendering both sex and religion private paradoxically compel Muslim women to reveal in public the innermost details of their sexual and religious lives. That dual incitement to hide and to exhibit, and the grim consequences of exhibiting that which must be hidden, constitute "the cunning of secular power." Mayanthi Fernando is Assistant Professor Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is currently a visiting professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Wesleyan University for Spring 2013. Her first book is Asymmetries of the Republic: Islam, Secularism, and the Future of France, forthcoming from Duke University Press.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Birthright Palestine

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

During the lecture Dana Yahalomi, Public Movement Leader, will present key strategies developed by the movement alongside examples of previous actions. In the last six years, Public Movement has explored the regulations, forces, agents, and policies, formations of identity and systems of ritual which govern the dynamics of public life and public space. The Movement was founded in December 2006 by Omer Krieger and Dana Yahalomi, who later assumed sole leadership in 2011.The lecture will conclude and open into discussion with the recent action SALONS: Birthright Palestine? (February - April 2012, New Museum, NYC) which used the phenomenon of Birthright Israel(1) in order to raise questions about nationality and heritage, as well as about the politics of tourism and branding. In a series of performative public discussions, each adopting existing formats of discursive forums, different publics presented and debated upon related questions and issues that would inform, affirm and/or oppose the proposal to initiate a Birthright Palestine program.

Public Movement is a performative research body which investigates and stages political actions in public spaces. It studies and creates public choreographies, forms of social order, overt and covert rituals. Among Public Movement's actions in the past and in the future: manifestations of presence, fictional acts of hatred, new folk dances, synchronized procedures of movement, spectacles, marches, inventing and reenacting moments in the life of individuals, communities, social institutions, peoples, states, and of humanity.

Public Movement has taken responsibility for the following actions: "Accident" (Tel- Aviv, 2006), "The Israel Museum" (Tel- Aviv, 2007), "Also Thus!" (Acco Festival, 2007), "Operation Free Holon" (The Israeli Center for Digital Art, 2007), "Change of Guard” (With Dani Karavan, Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, 2008), "Public Movement House" (Bat Yam Museum, 2008), “Emergency” (Acco Festival, 2008), “The 86th Anniversary of the assassination of President Gabriel Narutowicz by the painter Eligiusz Niewiadomski” (Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, 2008), "Spring in Warsaw" (Nowy Teatr, 2009), "Performing Politics for Germany" (HAU Berlin, 2009), “Positions” (Van AbbeMuseum, 2009), “First of May Riots “(HAU Berlin, 2010), "University Exercise" (Heidelberg, 2010), "SALONS: Birthright Palestine?" (New Museum, New York, 2012), “Rebranding European Muslims” (Berlin Biennial, 2012, Steirischer Herbst, 2012), “Debriefing Session” (Baltic Circle, Helsinki, 2012), "Civil Fast" (Jerusalem, 2012) and "The Reenactment of the Mount Herzl Terrorist Attack" (Upcoming).

The lecture has been supported by Artis www.artiscontemporary.org

1 Birthright Israel is a 10-day free trip for Jews between the ages of 18 to 26 who travel around Israel together on a bus. It was founded in 1999, sponsored by the government of Israel and American Jewish philanthropy. Over 300,000 people have participated in the program since its founding. Birthright Israel was founded in the hope to address the following concerns: detachment of diaspora Jews to the state of Israel, an increase in intermarriages between Jews and non-Jews and a need to sustain the Israeli-American Lobby, which for years served Israel with political advocacy and a great source of funding.

Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Crashing Waves and Seabird Songs: Strategic Exoticism in the Popular Music of the Crimean Tatar

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

This is a talk based upon doctoral research in the Ukraine among the Sunni Muslim indigenous group of Crimea. 

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: László Z. Bitó ’60 Conservatory Building E-mail to Friend

Anthropology Lecture Series: Paul Kockelman

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Paul Kockelman is an Associate Professor at Barnard College and Columbia University. He is a linguistic anthropologist who is broadly interested in the relation between meaning, value, and information. He is the author of Language, Culture, and Mind: Natural Constructions and Social Kinds (Cambridge University Press 2009), as well as numerous articles.

His scholarship has focused on a broad set of interrelated topics concerning language, culture and mind. Methodologically, he draws on his empirical research to analyze relations among grammatical categories, discourse patterns, social relations, and cultural values as they unfold in both face-to-face and more mediated forms of interaction. His research has been sustained by extensive linguistic and ethnographic fieldwork, primarily among speakers of Q’eqchi’-Maya living in the cloud forests of highland Guatemala, and now more and more among scientists and engineers working on and with a variety of information technologies.

Sponsored by Anthropology and Mind, Brain & Behavior.

Time: 6:15 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend Conference

Thinking Like A River (opening night)

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Following on Wofford College’s successful Fall 2012 Thinking Like a River Conference, Thinking Like a River moves north—to Bard College. John Lane—poet, naturalist, southern nature writer and river rat—launched the first Thinking Like a River weekend and he will be on campus to lead discussions and canoe outings over the course of the weekend. With him will be poets, writers, activists, naturalists and river lovers discussing rivers in an interdisciplinary manner. The weekend will kick off on Thursday September 26 at 6 in Bard Hall with music, poems and local food!  Bard graduate Chris Rubeo will sing river songs in the tradition of Pete Seeger and Betty and the Baby Boomers and talk about his environmental work. Art from Lisa Sanditz’s art class will grace the walls along with photographs from Tim Davis’s color photography class.  Guests John Lane and Elizabeth Bradfield will read poems and they will be joined by Bard College faculty Celia Bland and Phil Pardi. Come think about rivers and learn more about Bard’s Environmental and Urban Studies Program.

Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Bard Hall, Bard College Campus
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Conversation

Shamanism, Vegetalismo, and the Aesthetics of Healing

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

François Demange
In conversation with Abou Farman
(Department of Anthropology)François Demange (MA Anthropology) has been training with indigenous medicine people and practicing their healing methods since 1996 in both the Peruvian Amazon and in North America.  He is considered one of the most experienced Westerners in the practice of the traditional Amazonian medicine called Vegetalismo, which is defined as the plant spirit medicine practice of that region. François is also a follower of the Red Path; he is a pipe carrier, a Sundancer, and has been adopted by the Dakota Nation.  He uses a combination of spiritual and energetic methods to read, diagnose and address the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual imbalance in his patients. He is a Reiki Master and Co-Founder of Sacred Medicine Foundation.

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Bard Hall, Bard College Campus E-mail to Friend Lunch/Dinner

An Evening of Central Asian Culture and Cooking with AUCA-Bard Staff

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Join the AUCA-Bard staff for an evening of Central Asian culture and cooking! Learn to make Eurasian favorites like plov and manti or just enjoy the food and company.

Held in Robbins House kitchens and common room.

Time: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Robbins House
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Central Asian Cooking Night

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Join the AUCA-Bard staff for an evening of Central Asian culture and cooking! Learn to make Eurasian favorites like plov and manti or just enjoy the food and company.

Held in Tewksbury Hall kitchens and common roomJoin the AUCA-Bard staff for an evening of Central Asian culture and cooking! Learn to make Eurasian favorites like and or just enjoy the food and company.Held in the Tewksbury Hall Kitchen and common room

Time: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Tewksbury Hall
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend Other Type; Workshop

Thinking the City: Literature, Theory, Visual Arts

Friday, April 12, 2013

This day-long workshop brings together Bard faculty and students to explore a range of questions on teaching and learning about cities in an academic context.

We will ask: How do the reading of texts, the building of cultural monuments, and the creation of artistic works transform our understandings of the city? Is it possible to read the city as a text or view it as a cultural monument? Are there cities better preserved in cultural memory than physical space? How are identities and ideas of cities formed through literature, film, and other media? In what ways can these different strategies of representation transform the urban experience and the city itself?

Students will present their work on cities at a panel, to be followed by a roundtable for faculty on teaching methodologies, theoretical frameworks, and principles of canon formation to consider when discussing cities and urban space in the classroom.

Time: 10:00 am – 3:00 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend Bard Event

Latin Dance Presentation and Music by "La Familia"

Friday, April 5, 2013

Enjoy of the dance, food, and Latin music of the Latin week at Bard.

Time: 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Location: Campus Center MPR E-mail to Friend

Latinidad: Latin@ Student Identity at Bard

Thursday, April 4, 2013

A panel discussion with Bard students, staff, and faculty.
Panelist: Katherine Del Santo '13, Rosemary Ferreira '14, Marial Hoz '14, Julieth Nuñez '14, Melanie Mignucci '16, Adolfo Coyotel '16.

Time: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Location: RKC Room 103 E-mail to Friend

Semana Latina / Latin Week

Monday, April 1, 2013

Enjoy the reading of poetry in Spanish and English by students at Bard, right after Junot Diaz reading.

Time: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Location: Olin Hall E-mail to Friend

Anthropology Lecture Series: The Politics of Humanitarianism Beyond the Human

Tuesday, December 4, 2012


Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Olin 102 E-mail to Friend

Film Screening: Sari Soldiers

Thursday, November 15, 2012

The fourth and final installment of a semester-long film series sponsored by the Anthropology Department, Sari Soldiers comes from director Julie Bridgham.

Filmed over the course of three years, The Sari Soldiers chronicles the lives of six Nepalese women following Nepal’s recent civil war. From the dedicated commander of a Maoist battalion to the student leader of the pro-democracy movement in Katmandu, these women are carving out revolutionary spaces in the midst of a complex and violent conflict. When one woman’s daughter goes missing, the six women’s stories swirl around the search to bring her home, capturing the many sides of opposition in Nepal, and illustrating with grace and eloquence the changing attitudes towards women’s involvement in the country.

Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Film screening: Devi

Friday, November 9, 2012

The third installment of a semester-long film series sponsored by the Anthropology Department, Devi comes from director Satyajit Ray.

The film is set in 1860 at Chandipur, in rural Bengal, India. Devi focuses on a young woman, who is deemed a goddess when her father-in-law, a rich feudal landlord, envisions her as the Goddess Kali.

Ray's feeling for the intoxicating beauty within the disintegrating way of life of the 19th century landowning class makes this one of the rare, honest films about decadence.
- Pauline Kael

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Kevin Carrico: Reimagining the Real China

Thursday, November 8, 2012

What, when, and where is the real China? According to a growing group of young people in cities across the country, the real China is not to be found in the reality of the present. Instead of skyscrapers, mega-events, new fashion, and globalization, the groups discussed in this talk envision courtyard homes, ancient rituals, organic foods, traditional robes, and sociocultural homogeneity as embodying the proper essence of China, an eternal land of rites and etiquette (liyi zhi bang). Drawing upon ethnographic research conducted with members of the Han Clothing Movement and rapidly growing Confucian and traditionalist educational associations, this talk examines the rise of social movements dedicated to a fundamentally conservative vision of China within a rapidly urbanizing, globalizing, and increasingly complex society. What are these movements’ main ideals, objectives, and practices? Why have they emerged at this moment? Who joins these movements, and what benefits do they derive from their involvement? Yet most importantly, is their “real China” of the past any more real than the present? And what are the repercussions of these tensions between reality and imagining, or between actuality and ideals, in the national experience in general?

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend

Panel Discussion: Bridging the Gap between the Classroom and the Field

Monday, November 5, 2012

Dave Crawford is Associate Professor and Chair of Sociology and Anthropology at Fairfield University in Connecticut. His anthropological fieldwork has focused on Berber speakers in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco, particularly regarding issues of globalization, the transition to wage labor, gender and household dynamics, and social inequality. He won the Julian Steward Award for his first book, Moroccan Households in the World Economy, and he has a coedited volume coming out this spring, Encountering Morocco: Fieldwork and Cultural Experience.

J. Zerrin Holle is a student in the Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies Departments at Bard. Her ongoing fieldwork involves working with Kurdish communities that are internally displaced throughout Turkey, specifically in Istanbul. Her research focuses on issues of forced migration and resettlement.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement and MES.

Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend

Film Screening: The Home and the World

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

The second installment of a semester-long film series sponsored by the Anthropology Department, The Home and the World comes from director Satyajit Ray.

"The Home and the World is based on a novel of the same name by the Hindu writer Rabindranath Tagore, a Nobel Prize winner. Satyajit Ray, the greatest Indian director, was a young man when he first wrote a screenplay based on the novel, but it has taken him thirty-five years to film it. It is a contemplative movie -- quiet, slow, a series of conversations punctuated by sudden bursts of activity. The suspense in the movie and the drama all form around the changing character of Bimala, the wife. We see her move from total seclusion to the ability to act recklessly and with courage. Together, [the characters] form a small group of ideas and emotions, growing and shifting, mirroring in their secluded chambers the violent changes in India.
-Roger Ebert

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

Anthropology Lecture Series: Michel Agiers

Tuesday, October 23, 2012


Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Olin 102 E-mail to Friend

Filmmaker Kidlat Tahimik

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

"Tahimik made a triumphant entrance onto the world cinema stage in the
late 70s/early 80s with the appearance of his feature films PERFUMED
NIGHTMARE and TURUMBA, which remain two of the most uncategorizable,
formally audacious, profoundly entertaining, deeply whimsical, yet politically incisive films in post-colonial cinema. Since then, Tahimik’s work has had very little exposure in North America, even as he has been busier than ever, focusing his boundless energy on a series of adventures, projects, and films ranging from the epic to the compact to the fragmentary.

Kidlat who involves himself in every single step of filmmaking, from script-writing through shooting, editing, acting, and producing to directing. By doing this, he has made a great contribution to global filmmaking culture, and has won international acclaim for his unique style of presenting a distinctively Filipino combination of third-world self-consciousness and pride, wrapping this up in his own individual sense of humour."

Time: 1:30 pm
Location: Avery Art Center, Center for Film, Electronic Arts and Music E-mail to Friend

Film Screening: Pather Panchali

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

The first installment of a semester-long film series sponsored by the Anthropology Department, Pather Panchali comes from director Satyajit Ray.

"The first film by the masterly Satyajit Ray - possibly the most unembarrassed and natural of directors - is a quiet reverie about the life of an impoverished Brahman family in a Bengali village. Beautiful, sometimes funny, and full of love, it brought a new vision of India to the screen."
- Pauline Kael

Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Preston
Website: Event Website E-mail to Friend

"Indigenous Ontologies, Digital Futures: Plural Provenances and the Challenge of Collaborative Museum Documentation"

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Aaron GlassBard Graduate Center

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: RKC 101 E-mail to Friend

"Rainy Days and Precious Things: Reconceptualizing Tangibility and Value in a Brazilian World Heritage Center"

Thursday, March 22, 2012

John Collins
Department of Anthropology, CUNY

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium E-mail to Friend

"Indigenous Ontologies, Digital Futures: Plural Provenances and the Challenge of Collaborative Museum Documentation"

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Aaron Glass
Bard Graduate Center

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: RKC 101 E-mail to Friend

"Indigenous Ontologies, Digital Futures: Plural Provenances and the Challenge of Collaborative Museum Documentation"

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Aaron Glass
Bard Graduate Center

Time: 5:00 pm
Location: RKC 101 E-mail to Friend Lecture

Kevin Carrico: Reimagining the Real China

Thursday, November 8, 2012

What, when, and where is the real China? According to a growing group of young people in cities across the country, the real China is not to be found in the reality of the present. Instead of skyscrapers, mega-events, new fashion, and globalization, the groups discussed in this talk envision courtyard homes, ancient rituals, organic foods, traditional robes, and sociocultural homogeneity as embodying the proper essence of China, an eternal land of rites and etiquette (liyi zhi bang). Drawing upon ethnographic research conducted with members of the Han Clothing Movement and rapidly growing Confucian and traditionalist educational associations, this talk examines the rise of social movements dedicated to a fundamentally conservative vision of China within a rapidly urbanizing, globalizing, and increasingly complex society. What are these movements’ main ideals, objectives, and practices? Why have they emerged at this moment? Who joins these movements, and what benefits do they derive from their involvement? Yet most importantly, is their “real China” of the past any more real than the present? And what are the repercussions of these tensions between reality and imagining, or between actuality and ideals, in the national experience in general?

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: RKC 103 E-mail to Friend

Filmmaker Kidlat Tahimik

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

"Tahimik made a triumphant entrance onto the world cinema stage in the
late 70s/early 80s with the appearance of his feature films PERFUMED
NIGHTMARE and TURUMBA, which remain two of the most uncategorizable,
formally audacious, profoundly entertaining, deeply whimsical, yet politically incisive films in post-colonial cinema. Since then, Tahimik’s work has had very little exposure in North America, even as he has been busier than ever, focusing his boundless energy on a series of adventures, projects, and films ranging from the epic to the compact to the fragmentary.

Kidlat who involves himself in every single step of filmmaking, from script-writing through shooting, editing, acting, and producing to directing. By doing this, he has made a great contribution to global filmmaking culture, and has won international acclaim for his unique style of presenting a distinctively Filipino combination of third-world self-consciousness and pride, wrapping this up in his own individual sense of humour."

Time: 1:30 pm
Location: Avery Art Center, Center for Film, Electronic Arts and Music E-mail to Friend Panel

Panel Discussion: Bridging the Gap between the Classroom and the Field

Monday, November 5, 2012

Dave Crawford is Associate Professor and Chair of Sociology and Anthropology at Fairfield University in Connecticut. His anthropological fieldwork has focused on Berber speakers in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco, particularly regarding issues of globalization, the transition to wage labor, gender and household dynamics, and social inequality. He won the Julian Steward Award for his first book, Moroccan Households in the World Economy, and he has a coedited volume coming out this spring, Encountering Morocco: Fieldwork and Cultural Experience.

J. Zerrin Holle is a student in the Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies Departments at Bard. Her ongoing fieldwork involves working with Kurdish communities that are internally displaced throughout Turkey, specifically in Istanbul. Her research focuses on issues of forced migration and resettlement.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement and MES.

Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Olin, Room 102 E-mail to Friend Performance

Performances: Osagyefo Theatre Company from Ghana

Friday, March 19, 2004 – Saturday, March 20, 2004

The Ghanaian Osagyefo Theatre Company, in residence at Bard College from March 17–20, will offer two performances. On Friday, March 19, the company will perform "Dances of Life," a
series of contemporary and traditional African dances; and on Saturday, March 20, they will present the play Verdict of the Cobra, written by Mohammed Ben Abdallah. Both programs are free to the Bard and Vassar communities; an $8 donation is requested from the general public.

Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Olin Hall E-mail to Friend